County Executive Brian Hughes and Weights & Measures officials look on as a Shade Tree Division employee reads the measurement for Brian MooreFull size photo

County Executive Brian Hughes and Weights & Measures officials look on as a Shade Tree Division employee reads the measurement for Brian Moore's record-setting Amaranth specimen. Moore's Amaranth plant measured a record-shattering 23 feet, 2 inches.

Contact: Julie Willmot
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Ewing Man's Specimen Measures 23 ft, 2 in

TRENTON, N.J. -Shortly after 10 this morning, one Ewing Township man realized his dream of shattering a world record.

Brian Moore welcomed County Executive Brian M. Hughes, Weights & Measures officials, a Shade Tree Division bucket truck, County Horticulturist Barbara Bromley, and County Counsel Arthur Sypek onto his Willis Road property on Monday morning to measure what he believed to be a 23-foot specimen of Amaranthus Australis.

The tallest Amaranth plant currently on record in the Guinness Book of World Records measured 15 feet. Ascending to the top of the plant in a bucket truck, a Shade Tree Division employee confirmed that this plant's height was in fact a record-smashing 23 feet, 2 inches.

"I'm thrilled that Mr. Moore has managed to break the previous record for Amaranth cultivation by such a tremendous margin," said Hughes as he certified the results along with Weights & Measures officials and the County Counsel. "I hope that other agricultural enthusiasts in the County will find inspiration in Mr. Moore's outstanding achievement."

Weights & Measures professionals recorded the plant's actual height by implanting a steel measuring tape in the ground at the base of the plant, then sending up a member of the Shade Tree Division in a bucket truck to read the measurement. Pending acceptance of the certified 23 ft, 2 in measurement, this plant should appear in the next edition of the Guinness Book of World Records.

Native to the United States, Amaranthus Australis is a seasonal plant; after the first frost of the year, Moore's specimen will die.  It typically flourishes in warmer climates, including the southeastern United States. Moore began growing his Amaranth plant using seeds from the USDA Germplasm Database, and had a sample of the plant sent to the Diagnostic Lab at the Rutgers Cooperative Agricultural Extension to verify that it was indeed Amaranthus Australis.