Christie Administration Issues Mold Guidance for New Jersey Residents Recovering from Superstorm Sandy
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For Immediate Release: Contact:
April 15, 2013 Michael Drewniak
Colin Reed
609-777-2600
 

Christie Administration Issues Mold Guidance for New Jersey Residents Recovering from Superstorm Sandy

Free Mold Removal Training Classes to Be Held Near Impacted Communities
 
TRENTON, N.J. - The New Jersey Department of Health today released a Mold Guidelines for New Jersey Residents pamphlet created to provide direction to residents on addressing mold in homes in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. In addition, the Department is announcing a series of training classes in cooperation with the UMDNJ School of Public Health to assist homeowners, volunteers and public health and building code officials in mold removal and assessment.

"As New Jersey recovers and rebuilds from Superstorm Sandy, mold and its remediation may become a significant issue for many New Jersey residents," said Mary E. O'Dowd, New Jersey Health Commissioner. "Although molds are common in our environment, mold may become a problem when it grows inside homes. These guidelines were developed to better inform homeowners on how to ensure their homes are cleaned and remediated properly to avoid mold problems now and in the future."

Molds can cause staining of walls and ceilings and can affect building components causing property damage. Exposure to mold can cause nasal and throat irritation, coughing or wheezing, eye irritation, or, in some cases, skin irritation.

The pamphlet addresses a number of topics including mold-related health concerns, how to inspect for mold and tools and techniques for clean-up. For example:

  • If mold is visually apparent, resources should be used to correct any moisture problems and clean up mold contamination rather than testing.
  • For smaller areas less than 10 square feet that have been affected by mold growth, a homeowner or business owner may be capable of performing the work, but for larger areas greater than 100 square feet, a qualified contractor who has experience in mold or environmental contamination may be required.
  • Those performing remediation work need to be protected with gloves, a respirator, protective clothing and goggles.

Read the full release on the Governor's Office website:
http://www.state.nj.us/governor/news/news/552013/approved/20130415f.html