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Wood Burning in New Jersey

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AIR QUALITY

CHECK THE AIR QUALITY BEFORE YOU BURN

Check your local air quality at http://www.nj.gov/dep/airmon prior to burning wood. If the air quality in your area is poor, consider other heating alternatives.

PROPER WOOD BURNING PRACTICES

A properly installed, correctly used wood-burning appliance should be smoke free. If you see or smell smoke that means you may have a problem, and are not burning efficiently, which means more money out of your pocket. Practice the following guidelines to burn the right way in your appliance and reduce smoke inside and outside your home.

USEPA's 48-Hour Burn Wise Video Contest Winners

 

Other safety precautions should be taken prior to burning wood outside. Never burn outside when the wind is high, during a drought or high fire danger, or when the woods and vegetation are extremely dry. Check the New Jersey Fire Service webpage for burning restrictions.

ALTERNATIVES TO WOOD BURNING

You can reduce overall heating needs and heating bills by improving the insulation in your home; caulking around windows, doors, and pipes to seal air gaps; and adding weather-stripping to doors and windows. The USEPA's ENERGY STAR Home Improvement provides information on home sealing.

You could also consider one of the other energy sources listed below.