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Introduction
Objectives
Methods
Schedule
Budget

TABLES & FIGURES

Table 1. Planned Sampling -Task I

Table 2. Analyte List for Task I

Table 3. Planned Sampling -Task II

Table 4. Analyte List for Task II

Table 5. Analytical Methods for Task I & II

Table 6. GERG Analytical Detection Limits

Table 7. ANSP Analytical Detection Limits

Table 8. Estimated Sample Collection & Analytical Costs -Task I

Table 9. Estimated Sample & Analytical Cost - Task II

Table 10. Marine & Estuarine Samling Stations for 2004

Figure 1. Routine Monitoring Prog. & Advisory Schedule

Figure 2. All Sampling Locations

Figure 3. Sampling Location in the Northwest Region

 


Work plan - Adobe PDF version
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The work plan is also available in PDF format by clicking on this link.
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I. INTRODUCTION

Fish and shellfish consumption advisories due to toxic chemical contamination were announced in New Jersey in the 1980s and 1990s. Data from Division of Science, Research and Technology (DSRT) studies revealed that unacceptable risks existed for eating certain species of fish and shellfish from certain waters in the State. These advisories particularly apply to pregnant women, nursing mothers and young children because polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxin and mercury are known to cause birth defects, developmental problems, neurological problems and/or cancer. However, limited new data has been generated in the past ten years. Therefore, it is not known how appropriate the advisories are today. Current advisories are listed on NJDEP’s Website (www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw).

Therefore, new data are needed on a recurring basis to evaluate and adjust advisories as appropriate. Without regular monitoring data, current advisories could be either under or overly protective of human health. The primary objectives of the monitoring program are;

  1. To provide current and more comprehensive data on concentrations of toxic contaminants in fish and shellfish in order to assess human health risks and thus update/recommend fish consumption advisories, and
  2. To provide data to develop environmental indicators to assess the progress of environmental management actions (See Program Objectives below).

A statewide “Routine Monitoring Program for Toxics in Fish” has been developed. However, the scope of work detailed in this Work Plan covers only 1) the Marine and Estuarine components of the proposed statewide Monitoring Plan (i.e., Year 2 of the plan), and 2) a separate stand-alone investigation of dioxin and other contaminants on the tidal Passaic River and its downstream receiving waters, which will support both the Department’s Natural Resource Damage (NRD) claim process as well as its Passaic River Directive.

Note: It is important to add, that a dedicated source of annually renewable funding for the complete “Routine Monitoring Program for Toxics in Fish” (on a rotating five year plan) would be preferable and more protective of public health and natural resources, as well as supplying a continuous means for enforcing State laws affecting the abatement of toxic chemical releases into the waters of the State.

II. OBJECTIVES

The primary goal of the Monitoring Program is to update the human health consumption advisories for certain foodfish species and/or geographic areas. However, NJDEP recognizes the additional potential usages of these data for such important collateral activities as natural resources management, hazardous site characterization, water quality assessment, natural resource damage claims, and Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) development. Where possible, the Monitoring Plan has been designed in cooperation with these Programs and in such a way as to meet the Department’s data quality objectives (fish and shellfish collection and analytical techniques) and to maximize benefits for each individual program. The Program Objectives described below outline some of these goals.

Division of Fish and Wildlife

The marine resources in New Jersey support some of the largest recreational and commercial fisheries on the United States Atlantic Coast. On average, about one million recreational anglers spend over 5 million days fishing our marine waters. Each year, recreational marine anglers spend over $750 million resulting in over 20,000 full time equivalent jobs and $45 million in sales tax income to New Jersey. The commercial fishery has approximately 1,900 commercial fishing vessels producing dockside sales of fish, shellfish and crustaceans valued at over $95 million annually. The commercial industry employs approximately 22,000 people in the harvesting, processing and wholesale and retail sales of marine fish and shellfish. The combined value of the commercial and recreational industries to the economy of New Jersey is between $1.5 and $2.1 Billion. These numbers do not include the value that our marine environment and fishing opportunities have on New Jersey’s tourist industries. Approximately one-third of all marine-angling participants are non-residents.

Consumption advisories have undoubtedly affected and will continue to affect the quality of the fishing experience and therefore the amount of money spent on fishing in New Jersey. A regular and continuing fish tissue-sampling program will aid in issuing up to date and accurate fish advisories as well as support advisory outreach efforts. A consistent positive message on the benefits of eating seafood along with a fish tissue-sampling program will benefit the recreational and commercial fishing interests in New Jersey.

Measurements of contaminants up the food chain can also assist in assessing ecological as well as human health risks in the region. Monitoring of contaminant levels in piscivorous (fish-eating) birds is planned to determine the magnitude and effects of contaminants at higher trophic levels. Cormorants are common in the harbor and a strict piscivore. Cormorants have wide foraging ranges, however birds tied to a nesting colony have a more localized range. Therefore, eggs and/or blood from nesting colony birds will be targeted for sampling. Samples will be collected from Shooters Island (Newark Bay) and Swinburne Island (Lower Bay). Data will be compared to samples collected by New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) in 1999.

Office of Natural Resource Restoration (ONRR)

ONRR pursues restoration of injured resources for the citizens of New Jersey. Having accurate fish tissue data will enable ONRR to effectively prioritize damage assessment of watershed specific fishery resources. Accurate and up to date sampling results will also aid in producing legally and scientifically defensible damage assessments. This will further the cause for DEP to fully realize its natural resource trustee obligation under existing statutes. ONRR supports the current proposal and would find it beneficial if the scope of the proposal were expanded into additional watersheds, targeted additional fish species and include waterfowl sampling. Settlement monies recovered due to lost fishery resources will be returned to the public through primary and/or secondary restoration projects. These projects will have a nexus to the injury and will focus on improving the fishery resources that have been damaged.

Water Monitoring and Standards

The Bureau of Water Quality Standards and Assessment is responsible for water quality characterization and assessment of all waters of the State. Section 305(b) of the Federal Clean Water Act requires states to periodically (every two years) assess and report on the overall quality of their waters. These assessments are reported through the New Jersey Integrated Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Report (305(b) and 303(d)). Section 303(d) requires states to identify “Impaired Waters” where specific designated uses are not fully supported (See Appendix B). For these waters, the state is required to establish total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) in accordance with a priority ranking.

Marine Water Monitoring has indicated a need to collect bivalve (e.g., clam) samples in estuarine waters. Establishment of routine monitoring of bivalve tissues is needed in order to establish that they meet federal guidance levels for metals. Targeted contaminants identified under the National Shellfish Sanitation Program include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury and nickel. Meeting federal guidance values could result in opening additional waters to direct market harvest.

Division of Watershed Management

Approximately 117 TMDLs that are required as a result of listings for contaminated fish tissue will be due starting in 2006. The last group is due in 2011. It is very important that current fish tissue data be available for these TMDLs. Conditions have most likely changed since the available data were collected in 1987. In some cases, TMDLs may no longer be necessary, as environmental conditions have improved. This happened in Strawbridge Lake, one of New Jersey’s first completed TMDLs. Fish tissue contamination with chlordane was the basis for original listing, whereas current data were available to show that chlordane levels had dropped significantly. To develop a TMDL that reflects current conditions and solve existing contamination problems recurrent sampling and data gathering is crucial.

Site Remediation and Waste Management Program (SRWM)

SRWM’s Division of Remediation Management and Response is responsible for the remediation, management and response to environmental impacts associated with hazardous waste sites. For the purpose of evaluating the progress of site characterization and cleanup activities it is important to understand the pathways that contaminants travel through the environmental as well as the risks to both human health and the surrounding ecosystem. Aquatic food chain impacts are common side effects especially from a site contaminated with persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs) such as PCBs, dioxins and mercury. From a risk perspective fish contamination by PBTs can become an important remedial investigative concern in the Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, the first steps in the development of a clean up plan or a claim for natural resource damages. The analysis of fish from this Work Plan will assist SRWM in determining the fate and effects of PBTs from sites into the surrounding environment. Of particular interest to SRWP is the aquatic effects and bioaccumulation of dioxins from the Diamond-Alkali Facility on the Passaic River, which is the primary source of fish consumption advisories for the surrounding and downstream waters. The Diamond Alkali RI/FS for the Passaic River Area of Concern is ongoing and any additional data from fish contaminant results would be beneficial.

Ecological impacts are also a concern of SRWM. Impacts on the aquatic food chain from contaminants can be significant, and potential risks and impacts can be ascertained from the planned sampling. Levels of contaminants in fish and shellfish (i.e., crabs and lobster), as well as piscivorous birds can be used to approximate the potential ecological risks and impacts to the ecosystem.

III. METHODS

The scope of work is presented below in two tasks. Task I details the baseline status and trends sampling for the Coastal Region of the State. Whereas Task II presents more targeted sampling within the tidal Passaic River and Newark Bay for dioxin/furan analysis to support the Passaic River Directive and the Passaic River/Newark Bay Natural Resource Damage Claim. The latter sampling includes more dioxin analyses of samples, more species per site, and additional down bay sampling of the Lower Passaic-Hackensack Rivers, Newark and Raritan Bays, and Sandy Hook Bay. Sampling will be coordinated with other state or federal agencies’ fish/shellfish collection efforts (e.g., NMFS) where appropriate.

Task I. Coastwide Routine Monitoring: Estuarine & Marine Species

Seven species of estuarine-marine fish/shellfish (striped bass, bluefish, white perch, white catfish, American eel, blue crab and lobster) are under consumption advisories on a statewide, regional and waterway specific for PCB and/or dioxin contamination. These species and locations are a starting point for the design of the Fish Monitoring Program (See Table 1). Weakfish and five samples of other fish species of opportunity (snapper bluefish, winter flounder, menhaden or other species) will be collected from select locations. Unless specified, fillets from all coastal estuarine and marine species will be analyzed for PCBs, pesticides and total mercury, as well as lipids (Table 2). Monitoring for dioxins/furans at specific stations (e.g., Newark Bay and Raritan River) will be included in Task II. Sampling includes alongshore-coastal areas, Delaware Bay and Estuary and Barnegat Bay. If supplemental funding becomes available, additional sampling sites, fish species or non-routine contaminants may be included in the monitoring program. A subset of samples will be analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) under an initial screening assessment to be developed in conjunction with the laboratory.

The results of this monitoring will expand upon the existing contaminant database used to develop fish consumption advisories. The monitoring will identify chemical contaminant levels in Atlantic marine and estuarine species from several waterways throughout the coastal portions of the state.

TABLE 1. Planned Sampling Locations and Samples for Task I 

Sampling Locations
Striped Bass
Bluefish
Amer. Eel
Blue Crab*
White Perch
White Catfish
Weakfish
Other
Totals
Raritan River at Rt. 35        
5
     
5
Raritan Bay at Union Beach  
5
     
#
5
 
20
Delaware River      
5*
       
10
Delaware Bay
5
#
10
20
Navesink River    
5
         
5
Shrewsbury River    
5
         
5
Shark River    
5
         
5
Mullica River    
5
         
5
Atlantic Ocean just N of Sandy Hook
5
5
10
Atlantic Ocean at Island Beach State Park
5
5
10
Atlantic Ocean off Belmar
5
5
10
Atlantic Ocean E of Sea Isle City
5
5
10
Barnegat Bay at Toms River
 
 
 5
 5*
 
 
 5
 
20
Totals
25
25
25
20
5
5
20
10
135
ANALYSES: PCBs (congeners + coplanars), Pesticides & Mercury

* Each crab sample to be separately analyzed as muscle and hepatopancreas (i.e., total = sample x 2). Each sample will be a composite of approximately 5 individuals.
# Indicates potential collection site for indicated species.
Indicates potential collection site. A total of five samples of other fish species of opportunity (snapper bluefish, winter flounder, menhaden or other species) will be collected from one of these locations

TABLE 2. Analyte List for Task I

OC Pesticides
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (congeners)1
BHC (alpha, beta, gamma delta) 1 31,28 74 134,144 185 207
Heptachlor 3 33,21,53 70,76 107 174 194
Heptachlor epoxide 4,10 22 66,95 149 177 205
Chlordanes (gamma and alpha) 6 45 91 118 201,171 206
Nonachlors (cis2 and trans) 7 46 56,60 134 172,197 209
Dieldrin 8,5 52 101 131 180 16,32
DDDs (o,p and p,p) 14 49 99 146 193 163,138
DDEs (o,p3 and p,p) 19 48,47 83 132,153,105 191 25
DDTs (o,p and p,p) 12,13 44 97 141 199 63
Aldrin 18 37,42 81,87 137,176 170,190 151
Endosulfan I and II 17 41,71 85 158 198 128
Endrin 24,27 64 136 129,178 201 208,195
Oxychlordane 29 40 77,110 187,182 203,196  
Total Mercury 26 100 82 183 189  
 
Co-Planar PCBs
PBDEs 81 77 126 169    
Lipids            

1-PCB congeners appearing as pairs or triplets will coelute and will be reported as sum.
2-Evidence for PCB coelution with cis-nonachlor
3-o,p-DDE coelutes with PCB congeners 92,85

Task II. Tidal Passaic River and Downstream Receiving Waters (NRD)

In recognition of the continuing public health advisories associated with dioxin contamination in foodfish and shellfish within the tidal Passaic River, Newark Bay, the two Kills, Raritan and Sandy Hook Bays, as well as the near shore ocean waters of the New York Bight, a separate yet interrelated study will be carried out involving the collection of fish/shellfish/bird samples for dioxin/furan analysis. These locations will be sampled differentially for four species; white perch, striped bass, blue crab and American lobster within their preferred ecological zones or habitats (Table 3). An additional “species of opportunity” will be collected at two locations. Potential species include winter flounder, snapper bluefish, weakfish, and menhaden. Cormorant tissue (i.e., eggs and/or blood) will be collected at two locations. Species and sample location are designed to address multiple program data needs including water quality assessment, contaminated site assessment, natural resource damage claims, TMDLs and resource management concerns.

Each tissue (i.e., fillet, muscle, hepatopancreas, egg, and blood) will undergo analysis for dioxins/furans, PCBs/Pesticides, mercury and lipids (Table 4). Composite samples will be used for crab and lobster tissue. A subset of samples will also be analyzed for PBDEs under an initial screening assessment to be developed in conjunction with the laboratory.

Optional Sampling: DEP programs also identified several additional data needs. If money is available, additional species will be collected at the same or additional locations. Samples will potentially include bivalve clams (e.g., in Raritan/Sandy Hook Bay) and other fish species.

TABLE 3. Planned Sampling Locations and Samples for Task II

Sampling Locations
Crab*
Lobster*
White Perch
Striped Bass
Fish Species
Piscv. Bird**
Totals
Upper Tidal Passaic
5
10
Lower Tidal Passaic
5
3
3
16
Hackensack River
3
6
Newark Bay
3
6
15
Upper Bay
3
6
Arthur Kill
3
6
Raritan River
3
6
Western Raritan Bay
3
9
Eastern Raritan Bay
3
6
Mid-Lower Raritan Bay
3
5
2
6
24
Offshore NY Bight
5
10
Totals
68
20
3
5
6
12
114

* Each crab and lobster sample to be separately analyzed as muscle and hepatopancreas (i.e., total = sample x 2). Each sample will be a composite of approximately 5 individuals.
** Piscivorous bird samples will consist of cormorant eggs and/or blood.
Three samples of other fish species of opportunity will be collected in the Newark Bay/Passaic/Hackensack region, and three samples will be collected in Raritan Bay. Target species will include weakfish, winter flounder, snapper bluefish, and menhaden.

Tissue Processing

Fish tissue samples will be processed according to the planned analysis. The program will follow the procedure used in past monitoring programs (i.e., ANSP Procedure P-14-12 (Rev. 4 (12/00) titled Preparation of Fish Samples For Contaminant Analysis):

3.1.1 Fillet with skin, but with scales removed this is the default type of tissue sample for most scaly fish (i.e. sunfish and shad). This consists of the entire fillet or pairs of fillets (right and left sides), overlaying skin and belly flap meat.

3.1.3 Fillet without skin - (i.e. gar, catfish, sturgeon), This consists of the entire fillet, including the belly flap tissue, with skin and scales removed.

3.1.4 Fillet with skin on (except catfish and eels), scales off and including pelvic fin, rib cage and belly meat (equivalent to USFDA fillet and "New York standard fillet").

Fish prepared using 3.1.1 and 3.1.4 will be analyzed for organic compounds (i.e. PCBs, OCP, and dioxin) and fish prepared using 3.1.3 will be used for mercury analysis.

Table 4. Analyte List for Task II

OC Pesticides
Individual PCB congeners
Alpha HCH
1
41/46
118
180
Beta HCH
7/9
40
114
193
Gamma HCH
8/5
67
146
191
Delta HCH
30
63
153/132
200
Heptachlor
18/17
74/61
105
169
Heptachlor Epoxide
15
70
141/179
170/190
Oxychlordane
24/27
66
130
199
Alpha Chlordane
16/32
95/80
176/137
203/196
Gamma Chlordane
29
55/91
138/160
189
Cis-Nonachlor
26
56/60
58
195/208
Trans-Nonachlor
25
92
129
207
Aldrin
31
84
126
194
Dieldrin
28
101/90
178
205
Endrin
33/20
99
166
206
Pentachloroanisole
53
119
175
209
Chlorpyrifos
22/51
83
187
Mirex
45
97
183
Coplanar PCBs
Endosulfan II
46
81
128
81
Methoxychlor
39
87/115
167
77
2,4' DDE
69
85
185
126
4,4' DDE
52
136
174
169
2,4' DDD
49
110/77
177
4,4' DDD
47/75
82
171/202
2,4' DDT
48
151
156
4,4' DDT
44
135
201/157/173
Trace Metals
42/59/37
107
172
Mercury
72
149/123
197
Lipids
Dioxins and Furans
2,3,7,8-TCDD 2,3,7,8-TCDF 1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDF
1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF
1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDD 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF 1,2,3,4,7,8,9, -HpCDF
1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDF OCDF
1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDD 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDF OCDD
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD 2,3,4,6,7,8-HxCDF  
PBDEs    

Analytical Methods

The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (ANSP) and the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) at Texas A&M University will be conducting the analysis of all tissue samples. These laboratories will use the following analytical methods as outlined in Table 5 and detection limits are listed in Tables 6 and 7.

Table 5. Analytical Methods for Task I and II

DESCRIPTION OF PROCEDURES USED:

EPA Method

Approximate amount of fish tissue extracted (wet wt):
Method used for determining percentage water:
Method used for extractables (lipid):

Extraction method:
Extraction solvent:
Extraction time:
Sample extract cleanup method:

Analytical method used for PCBs and Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs):
Analytical Instrument.
Column Phase
Column Length, m
Column i.d., mm
Column film thickness, µm

Method of quantitation (IS = internal standard, ES = external standard):
Identity of internal standards/surrogates used that were:
Added PRIOR to extraction of sample:
Added after extraction/cleanup and JUST PRIOR to chromatographic analysis:

Number of Points on Calibration Curve
PCB Congeners
Pesticides
Range of Calibration Curve
PCB Congeners
Pesticides
Coplanar PCBs using HRGC/HRMS
Mercury using Cold Vapor AA
Sample Preparation: Microwave Assisted Digestion of Siliceous and Organically Based Matrices. 1996.
Sample Analysis: Mercury in Liquid Waste (Manual Cold-Vapor Technique). 1994. Rev. 1.


Dioxin using HRGC/HRMS

GERG
Modified 8082
PCBs by GC-ECD

~10 g
drying and weighing
gravimetric

 

grinding with sodium sulfate
dichloromethane
3 x 3 min
Slica gel/alumina and phenogel

GC-ECD
DB 5
30m
0.25 mm
0.25um

 

IS

DBOFB, PCB 103, PCB198
TCMX


4
4


5 to 200 ng/ul
5 to 200 ng/ul
EPA Method 1668

-
-





Modified EPA Method 1613

ANS
Modified 8082
PCBs by GC-ECD

~1 to 5 g
drying and weighing
gravimetric

 

grinding with sodium sulfate
dichloromethane
18 h Soxhlet
GPC followed by florosil



GC-ECD
DB 5
60 m
0.25 mm
0.25um



IS

PCB14, PCB65,PCB166
PCB30,PCB204

 

5
5


30 to 300 ng/ul
0.25 to 2.5 ng/ul
-

EPA, SW-846, modified Method 3052 EPA, SW-846, modified Method 7470A

 


-

Table 6. GERG Analytical Detection Limits

Pesticides
Detection Limit (ng/g wet)
PCB
Congeners
Detection Limit
(ng/g wet)

PCB
Congeners

Detection Limit
(ng/g wet)
Alpha HCH
0.01
PCB1
0.02
PCB118
0.02
Beta HCH
0.02
PCB7/9
0.02
PCB119
0.02
Gamma HCH
0.01
PCB8/5
0.02
PCB126
0.02
Delta HCH
0.01
PCB22/51
0.02
PCB128
0.01
Heptachlor
0.01
PCB24/27
0.02
PCB129
0.02
Heptachlor Epoxide
0.02
PCB25
0.02
PCB130
0.02
Oxychlordane
0.03
PCB26
0.02
PCB135
0.02
Alpha Chlordane
0.02
PCB28
0.02
PCB136
0.02
Gamma Chlordane
0.02
PCB29
0.02
PCB138 /160
0.03
Cis-Nonachlor
0.02
PCB30
0.02
PCB141/179
0.02
Trans-Nonachlor
0.04
PCB31
0.02
PCB146
0.02
Aldrin
0.02
PCB33/20
0.02
PCB149/123
0.02
Dieldrin
0.05
PCB39
0.02
PCB15
0.02
Endrin
0.04
PCB40
0.02
PCB151
0.02
Pentachloroanisole
0.01
PCB41/64
0.02
PCB153/132
0.05
Chlorpyrifos
0.06
PCB42/59/37
0.02
PCB156
0.02
Mirex
0.01
PCB44
0.02
PCB158
0.02
Endosulfan II
0.02
PCB45
0.02
PCB16/32
0.02
2,4' DDE
0.02
PCB46
0.02
PCB166
0.02
4,4' DDE
0.06
PCB47/75
0.02
PCB167
0.02
2,4' DDD
0.07
PCB48
0.02
PCB169
0.02
4,4' DDD
0.01
PCB49
0.02
PCB170/190
0.02
2,4' DDT
0.00
PCB52
0.02
PCB171/202
0.02
4,4' DDT
0.01
PCB53
0.02
PCB172
0.01
 
PCB55/91
0.02
PCB174
0.02
Dioxins & Furans
pg/sample1
PCB56/60
0.02
PCB175
0.02
2,3,7,8-TCDF
10.00
PCB63
0.02
PCB176/137
0.02
1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF
50.00
PCB66
0.02
PCB177
0.02
2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF
50.00
PCB67
0.02
PCB178
0.02
1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDF
50.00
PCB69
0.02
PCB18/17
0.02
1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDF
50.00
PCB70
0.02
PCB180
0.01
2,3,4,6,7,8-HxCDF
50.00
PCB72
0.02
PCB183
0.02
1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDF
50.00
PCB74/61
0.02
PCB185
0.02
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF
50.00
PCB81
0.02
PCB187
0.02
1,2,3,4,7,8,9-HpCDF
50.00
PCB82
0.02
PCB189
0.02
OCDF
100.00
PCB83
0.02
PCB191
0.02
2,3,7,8-TCDD
10.00
PCB84
0.02
PCB193
0.02
1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD
50.00
PCB85
0.02
PCB194
0.02
1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDD
50.00
PCB87/115
0.02
PCB195/208
0.01
1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD
50.00
PCB92
0.02
PCB197
0.02
1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDD
50.00
PCB95/80
0.02
PCB199
0.02
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD
50.00
PCB97
0.02
PCB200
0.02
OCDD
100.00
PCB99
0.02
PCB201/157/173
0.02
Coplanar PCBs
pg/sample1
PCB101/90
0.02
PCB203/196
0.02
PCB77
10.20
PCB105
0.01
PCB205
0.02
PCB81
10.00
PCB107
0.02
PCB206
0.01
PCB126
10.00
PCB110/77
0.02
PCB207
0.02
PCB169
10.40
PCB114
0.02
PCB209
0.01

1 - Dependent on size of sample extracted

Table 7. ANSP Analytical Detection Limits

Detection Limit
Detection Limit
Detection Limit
Pesticides
ng/g wet
PCB Congeners
ng/g wet
PCB Congeners
ng/g wet
opDDE
0.04
1
0.17
85
0.02
ppDDE
0.18
3
0.29
136
0.01
op ddt
0.12
4+10
0.07
77+110
0.11
pp ddt
0.51
7
0.03
82
0.02
o,p ddd
0.06
6
0.02
151
0.02
p,p ddd
0.14
8+5
0.12
135+144
0.02
 
0.00
19
0.03
107
0.01
alpha BHC
0.17
12+13
0.01
149
0.06
beta BHC
0.16
18
0.05
118
0.06
delta BHC
0.07
17
0.03
131
0.00
lindane
0.12
24+27
0.13
146
0.06
 
0.00
16+32
0.07
153+132+105
0.21
heptaclor
0.06
29
0.08
141
0.01
heptachlor epoxide
0.11
26
0.02
137+176
0.04
oxychlordane
0.09
25
0.23
163+138
0.14
gamma chlordane
0.30
31+28
0.13
158
0.06
alpha chlordane
0.12
53+33+21
0.07
129+178
0.02
cis nonachlor
0.10
22
0.11
187+182
0.05
trans nonachlor
0.16
45
0.02
183
0.03
 
0.00
46
0.02
128
0.02
dieldrin
0.02
52
0.09
185
0.02
endrin
0.08
49
0.07
174
0.02
aldrin
0.15
47
1.08
177
0.02
endosulfan 1
0.10
48
0.22
202+171
0.02
endosulfan II
0.06
44
0.07
157+200
0.03
 
37+42
0.06
172+197
0.08
 
41+71
0.08
180
0.07
PBDEs
To be determined
40
0.02
193
0.15
 
100
0.02
191
0.01
 
63
0.02
199
0.01
 
74
0.06
170+190
0.05
 
70+76
0.08
201
0.03
 
66+95
0.13
230+196
0.05
 
91
0.02
189
0.01
 
56+60
0.12
208+195
0.05
 
101
0.07
207
0.01
 
99
0.04
194
0.02
 
83
0.01
205
0.01
 
97
0.02
206
0.03
 
87+81
0.24
209
0.01

IV. SCHEDULE

This estuarine/marine component reflects Year 2 of the five-year plan meant to assess on a routine rotating basis, all the critical waterways in New Jersey where fish consumption advisories are in place due to the bioaccumulation of toxic chemicals (i.e., PCBs, dioxins, and mercury). See Figure 1 for the full fish advisory and sampling schedule for marine/estuarine waters.

Field Sampling (Summer –Fall 2004)
Task I routine fish sampling will begin in mid-late summer of 2004. Task II sampling will take place in late summer to early fall of 2004 (i.e., August through October). This will allow capture of fish and shellfish that have migrated into the estuary and spent the summer there creating the largest potential for bioaccumulation. These samples will reflect the largest potential for ecological effects, as well as potential health effects on fish consumers.

Laboratory Preparation and Analysis (2004 – 2005)
The laboratory will initiate sample preparation in August 2004. It is estimated that data will be available six months following the laboratories receipt of samples. Draft data will be available in May 2005.

Assessment and Reporting (Summer - Fall 2005)
The laboratory will prepare a draft report containing analytical and quality assurance/quality control procedures along with all of the sample data. This will be available by July 2005, and a Final Report will be available by November 2005. Data generated through this monitoring program will be utilized to identify the status and trends of selected contaminant levels in fish currently under fish consumption advisories. Other assessment activities will be coordinated with appropriate programs (e.g., NRD and water quality analysis for 305(b) and 303(d)) with recommendations for additional data collection as indicated.

All data generated will be placed in the NJDEP’s STORET database, which will then be posted to USEPA’s national STORET database. This will ensure that the information is readily accessible to other state and Federal agencies as well as the general public. All revisions to the state fish consumption advisories will also be posted on DSRT’s web site along with ArcView-based GIS maps with links to other relevant federal and state programs associated with contaminated food fish.

Draft fish advisories will be available for stakeholder review by September 2005. Final revised advisories will be issued in November 2005.

V. BUDGET

Task I Budget: Coastwide Routine Monitoring: Estuarine & Marine Species

The budget for Task I is listed in Table 8 and includes the number of sites and species to be sampled, the number of samples, and estimated costs. The estimated total cost is $216,075.

Table 8. Estimated Sample Collection and Analtical Costs - Task I

No. Sites No. Species Species No. Fish/site/species Subtotal Samples Analysis Cost Per sample ($) Subtotal Cost ($)
5
1
American Eel
5
25

PCBs+ Coplaners, OCP's & Mercury

 

Sample includes QA/QC

$1254
$31,125
2
1

Blue crab-

2 tissues*

5
20
$24,900
1
1
White Perch
5
5
$6,225
1
1
White Catfish
5
5
$6,225
5
1
Striped Bass- Coastal
5
25
$31,125
5
1
Bluefish
5
25
$31,125
3
1
Weakfish
5-10
20
$24,900
2
1
Other Species
5
10
$12,450
Approximately 20 samples from above fish species will be analyzed for PBDEs PBDEs
$200
$4,000
Total Number of Samples
135   Subtotal
$175,075
Collection & Processing
$44,375
TOTAL
$216,075

*1 muscle tissue + 1 hepatopancreas per sample

Task II Budget: Tidal Passaic River and Downstream Receiving Waters (NRD)

This component of the budget is estimated (i.e., final costs will be determined by contractor bid and the actual number of samples collected). The analytical contract for dioxin/furan, PCB congeners, mercury and PBDEs will be approximately $234,500 for the planned 114 samples. Another $49,000 is needed for field collection, reporting, equipment purchase, boat costs, and other miscellaneous costs. Therefore an estimated total cost for Task II would be approximately $284,000 (Table 9).

Table 9. Estimated Sample and Analytical Costs for Task II

No. Sites Species No. Samples Per Site Subtotal Samples Analysis Estimated Cost Per Sample ($) Subtotal Cost ($)
10
Blue Crab
3-5*
68
Dioxin/furans; Pesticides/PCBs; Hg
$2,040
$138,720
2

Lobster

5*
20
Dioxin/furans; Pesticides/PCBs; Hg
$2,040
$40,800
3
Striped Bass
2-3
5
Dioxin/furans; Pesticides/PCBs; Hg
$2,040
$10,200
3
White Perch
3
3
Dioxin/furans; Pesticides/PCBs; Hg
$2,040
$6,120
3
Fish Species
3
6
Dioxin/furans; Pesticides/PCBs; Hg
$2,040
$12,240
2
Piscivorous Bird
6
12
Dioxin/furans; Pesticides/PCBs; Hg
$2,040
$24,480
Approximately 10 samples from above fish species will be analyzed for PBDEs PBDEs
$200
$2,000
Total # Samples
114
  Subtotal
$234,560
Collection & Processing
$32,865
Reports
$16,500
TOTAL
$283,925

* Composite samples

TOTAL ESTIMATED PROJECT BUDGET: $500,000

Figure 2. All Sampling Locations

Figure 3. Sampling Locations in the Northeast Region

Table 10. Marine and Estuarine Sampling Stations for 2004

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