Governor Chris Christie • Lt.Governor Kim Guadagno
NJ Home
| Services A to Z | Departments/Agencies | FAQs
State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
Return to Office of Science Home
All documents are in Adobe PDF format. If you do not have the Adobe Reader, please click the Adobe icon. reader

report coverNutrient and Ecological Histories in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey - June 2011

The primary objective of this project was to collect sediment cores from tidal regions of Barnegat Bay and determine the chronology of nutrient changes (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) and associated ecosystem level responses. Sediment nitrogen concentrations increased towards the surface in three of the 4 cores collected indicating an increase in nutrient loading from portions of the watershed. Sediment nitrogen accumulation rates increased twofold at the up-bay site starting in the mid-1950s. Algal diatoms indicate major shifts toward more eutrophic conditions starting in the 1940-1950s consistent with an increase in sediment nutrients and appear to indicate impacts from increasing population and land use in the northern part of Barnegat Bay, an area with urban and suburban land use. The southern site is situated in a rural or semi-rural area and was the least impacted. Wetlands in Barnegat Bay can sequester approximately 79 % of the nitrogen and 54 % of the phosphorus estimated to be entering the Bay from upland sources. This illustrates the important ecosystem services that marshes can perform and how important it is to maintain and enhance marshes within Barnegat Bay. Sedimentation rates on salt marshes are at, or just below, the rate of relative sea level rise in Barnegat Bay. These relatively low rates of accretion render the marsh vulnerable to inundation should the rate of sea level rise accelerate in the future. Overall, the irreversible shifts recorded by diatom species suggest that, despite the fact that the Barnegat Bay wetlands are protected by both federal and state laws, these sites remain impacted by anthropogenic disturbances and did not return to their natural, reference conditions. On the contrary, the most recent changes suggest an increase in habitat deterioration and pollution. Thus, the changes recorded in diatom species convey a strong message to identify and limit all sources of nutrients that contribute to the degradation of the estuary and its watershed.

Research Project Summary
Final Report

Wetlands Biological Indicators for New Jersey Case Study: Forested Riparian Wetlands in the Highlands of New Jersey - May 2006report cover

The goals of this research were to build upon various wetland assessment projects conducted by New Jersey and to aid in development of a rapid wetland assessment tool that could work toward fulfilling the EPA mandate. A specific goal of this project was to identify biological indicators that reflect the ecological health and condition of riverine wetlands in the Highlands physiographic region. Longer-term goals are to better understand a) wetland condition and its relationship to water quality and b) to understand how broadly biological indicators can be applied to wetlands that vary in location, type and extent.

Report

report coverDevelopment of Wetland Quality and Function Assessment Tools and Demonstration - June 2004

The specific goal of this study was to enhance the state's ability to identify indicators for wetland value and function. To this end, the study focused on a suite of rapid assessment tools designed to evaluate wetland quality and function that could be readily implemented in the field.


Report

Appendix A - Database
Appendix B-D

Testing a Wetlands Mitigation Rapid Assessment Tool at Mitigation and Reference Wetlands within a New Jersey Watershed - Jureport coverne 2004

This project and the companion study above, Development of Wetland Quality and Function Assessment Tools and Demonstration, address approaches to assessing wetland function. The specific purpose of this study was to assist NJDEP in evaluation of the wetland qualitative assessment method that was developed to determine the probability that mitigated wetlands will perform wetland functions.

Report
Appendix

Creating Indicators of Wetland Status (Quantity and Quality): Freshwater Wetland Mitigation in New Jersey - March 2002

report coverThe primary objectives of this study were to assess New Jersey’s progress toward wetlands mitigation goals and develop indicators of progress toward these goals. The research was conducted by Amy S. Greene Environmental Consultants, Inc. (ASGECI), and co-managed by scientists from both the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s (NJDEP) Division of Science, Research and Technology (DSRT) and NJDEP’s wetlands regulatory program (Land Use Regulation Program or LURP). This study was supported by NJDEP’s Water Assessment and Environmental Indicators Research Programs. Relevant NJDEP managers were kept apprised of interim results and a peer review committee of leading state and national wetland scientists provided guidance throughout the duration of the study. For additional information about this report, please see the Dear Reader section.

Full Report
Executive Summary and Introduction
Design and Methods
Quality Assurance Program
Results and Discussion
Data Analysis
Conclusions, Recommendations & References
Appendices

For questions or comments regarding Wetlands research, please contact Dr. Robert Hazen
Office of Science
Dr. Gary A. Buchanan, Manager
Mailing Address:
Mail code 428-01, P.O. Box 420
P.O. Box 420
Trenton, NJ 0862

Phone: (609) 984-6070
Fax: (609) 292-7340


For Information regarding this site, please contact Terri Tucker.


department:njdep home | about dep | index by topic | programs/units | dep online
statewide:njhome | citizen | business | government | services A to Z | departments | search

Copyright State of New Jersey, 1996-2014

Last Updated: June 19, 2014