World Water Monitoring Day (2008)
Kids Help Celebrate World Water Monitoring Day!

Over 75 local school children and their teachers learned from and interacted with staff from the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC), the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) New Jersey district office, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), the New Jersey Water Supply Authority, the New Jersey Watershed Ambassadors, and the Lower Delaware Wild and Scenic Management Committee as these agencies demonstrated different water quality monitoring techniques on Thursday, October 16, 2008, as part of the World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) celebration.

The event took place at the historic Prallsville Mills in Stockton, N.J. along the Delaware River, the Delaware and Raritan Canal, and the Wickecheoke Creek.

The students who were on hand to observe and take part in measuring the quality of the water attend the Stockton School, Hunterdon Christian Academy, Leonia High School, and North Warren High School.  This year, a few home schooled students also were in attendance.

The attendees were welcomed on the sunny, warm autumn day by NJDEP Water Monitoring & Standards Administrator Leslie McGeorge, USGS New Jersey Supervisory Hydrologist Bob Reiser, DRBC Executive Director Carol R. Collier, Hunterdon County Freeholder Ron Sworen, and Delaware River Mill Society Executive Director Edie Sharp.

Following the brief opening remarks, the students and their teachers divided into groups and spent about 20 minutes at each of the various stations set up on the park grounds. The subjects of the eight stations included biological monitoring, chemical monitoring, stream flow monitoring, marine water monitoring, ground water monitoring, and watersheds.

World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) is coordinated by the Water Environment Federation and the International Water Association to engage the public in global efforts to protect and enhance worldwide water quality. Each year from September 18 to October 18, people around the globe join together to monitor the quality of their local watersheds and enter the results of their efforts into an international database. WWMD organizers report that 46,000 people in 43 countries monitored in 2007 and they plan to expand participation to one million people in 100 countries by 2012. Additional WWMD information, including collected data, can be viewed at www.worldwatermonitoringday.org.

Link to NJDEP's WWMD Web Site