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2005 Frameworks for Technological Literacy

Technology integration is the seamless and effective use of 21st century technology within an instructional setting to support students and teachers in the learning process with administrative support and evaluation. Curriculum integration:

    • infuses 21st Century technology across all curriculum areas in a relevant learner-centered environment that engages students and increases achievement;
    • effectively implements technology that requires teachers to develop teaching strategies that lead to academic success for each student;
    • supports higher-order thinking skills such as information-gathering, information-organizing, evaluating, problem solving and decision making, while working as a team member and developing communication skills; and 
    • requires support of all stakeholders within the community.

When the State Board of Education adopted the State’s graduation requirements, it indicated that technological literacy should be integrated across the curriculum. 

In order to help districts and schools develop and implement curriculum related to technological literacy, several documents have been developed to assist teachers, curriculum directors, and administrators.  A horizontal design can be found at (Insert web link).  The purpose of the horizontal design is to show when students need to be able to complete the cumulative progress indicators and what would follow.  Keep in mind that once students start developing technological skills in an area at a grade level, the students need to continue to use the skills at upper grade levels.  Students at the high school level should be using technology to research information in all content areas/classes, produce both short and long reports, develop brochures, graphics and other visual representations, and develop and use spreadsheet and database features.  Students need to know ethical procedures for using these communications tools in school, home, and business world. 

Committees of people from districts worked on developing framework examples for Standard 8.0 Technological Literacy during the spring and summer of 2005.  Those framework activities will be posted on this website over time.  Please refer  to this site for new examples during the year.  Many of the project-based activities developed in Chapter 6 of the New Jersey Cross-Content Workplace Readiness Curriculum Framework: A Road Map for Learning may also be used.  See the link at http://www.nj.gov/njded/frameworks/ccwr/.  (Be sure to go to Chapter 6.)

The new framework activities were developed for elementary (K-4), middle/junior high (5-8) and high school (9-12).  The chart below lists titles of framework activities used in an integrated approach by grade level.  Teachers may want to look at lower or higher levels of activities depending on the particular group of student’s interests and abilities.  Many of the framework activities have activity pages or sample assessment strategies. 

Elementary School

Middle/Junior High School

High School

A possible way of assessing a student’s overall skills in technological literacy is through the use of a portfolio.  See Chapter 3 of the New Jersey Cross-Content Workplace Readiness Curriculum Framework: A Road Map for Learning found at http://www.nj.gov/njded/frameworks/ccwr/.

For those teachers looking for information related to Instructional Adaptations for Students with Diverse Needs go to Chapter 7 of the New Jersey Cross-Content Workplace Readiness Curriculum Framework: A Road Map for Learning found at http://www.nj.gov/education/archive/frameworks/ccwr/.

To learn more about project-based learning refer to Chapter 2 of the New Jersey Cross-Content Workplace Readiness Curriculum Framework: A Road Map for Learning found at http://www.nj.gov/education/archive/frameworks/ccwr/.

Another tool for teachers is a list of the standards, indicators, and CPIs with short references to the New Jersey Cross-Content Workplace Readiness Curriculum Framework: A Road Map for Learning found at http://www.nj.gov/education/archive/frameworks/ccwr/.  Included in this document is also a brief listing of possible activities that might be further developed by teachers for classroom use.  This document will be available soon.