New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
May 1996

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Social Studies Standards And Progress Indicators
Standard 6.4:
All Students Will Acquire Historical Understanding Of Societal Ideas And Forces Throughout The History Of New Jersey, The United States, And The World

Descriptive Statement: The present can only be understood in the context of understanding how and why people acted in the past. History studies human behavior and motivation, since people have created governments and institutions based on their needs. Students should have opportunities to study the impact of various societal forces on the history of New Jersey, the United States, and the world.

In order to ensure that students share a common core of knowledge, by the end of their school experience students should have studied all five of the major periods in United States history cited in Social Studies Standard 6.3. In addition, students should have studied all seven of the World History periods cited in Social Studies Standard 6.3. School districts are encouraged to define the balance among materials from Western, Asian, African, and other world cultures in each of these periods. Furthermore, several suggested themes are included among the history standards to enhance and enrich the study of history.

Cumulative Progress Indicators

By the end of Grade 4, students:

1.

Compare and contrast similarities and differences in daily life over time.

2.

Identify social institutions, such as family, religion, and government, that function to meet individual and group needs.

3.

Identify instances when the needs of an individual or group are not met by their social institutions.

4.

Identify events when people have engaged in cruel and inhumane behavior.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in the preceding grades, by the end of Grade 8, students:

5.

Compare and contrast developments in societies separated by time and/or distance.

6.

Compare and contrast fixed customs of societies in the past and the present, and explain how these customs represent the society's beliefs.

7.

Understand how family, community, and social institutions function to meet individual and group needs.

8.

Understand how historical and contemporary ideas, perceptions, and occurrences have led to prejudice, discrimination, expulsion, genocide, slavery, and the Holocaust.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in the preceding grades, by the end of Grade 12, students:

9.

Evaluate the views, beliefs, and impact of different social groups on a given historical event or issue.

10.

Evaluate how individuals, groups, and institutions influence solutions to society's problems.

11.

Analyze historical and contemporary circumstances in which institutions function either to maintain continuity or to promote change.

12.

Argue an ethical position regarding a dilemma from the study of key turning points in history.

13.

Evaluate actions an individual, group, or institution might take to counteract incidents of prejudice, discrimination, expulsion, genocide, slavery, and the Holocaust.

Themes

By the end of their school years, students should have studied, within the periods outlined above, a designated number of the following specific themes:

The history of social classes and relations; the history of gender differentiation; the history of slavery; the history of agriculture; the history of population movements; the history of cities and city life.

 

 

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