Core Curriculum Content Standards

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Visual and Performing Arts Learning Progressions

1.1 The Creative Process All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
A. Dance
NOTE: By the end of grade 2, all students progress toward BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in DANCE. NOTE: By the end of grade 5, all students demonstrate BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in DANCE. NOTE: By the end of grade 8, those students choosing DANCE as their required area of specialization demonstrate COMPETENCY in the following content knowledge and skills. NOTE: By the end of grade 12, those students choosing DANCE as their required area of specialization demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills.
Content: Original choreography and improvisation of movement sequences begins with basic understanding of the elements of dance.

1.1.2.A.1Identify the elements of dance in planned and improvised dance sequences.
Content: Basic choreographed structures employ the elements of dance.

1.1.5.A.1Analyze both formal and expressive aspects of time, shape, space, and energy, and differentiate basic choreographic structures in various dance works.
Content: Numerous formal choreographic structures can be used to develop the elements of dance in the creation of dance works.

1.1.8.A.1Interpret the choreographic structures of contrast and transition, the process of reordering and chance, and the structures of AB, ABA, canon, call and response, and narrative.
Content: Creating master works in dance requires ability to comprehend, articulate, and manipulate time, space, and energy across and within a broad spectrum of choreographic structures and through the use of many choreographic devices.

1.1.12.A.1Articulate understanding of choreographic structures or forms (e.g., palindrome, theme and variation, rondo, retrograde, inversion, narrative, and accumulation) in master works of dance.
Content: Original movement is generated through improvisational skills and techniques.

1.1.2.A.2Use improvisation to discover new movement to fulfill the intent of the choreography.
Content: Movement is developed and generated through improvisation. Form and structure are important when interpreting original choreography.

1.1.5.A.2Analyze the use of improvisation that fulfills the intent of and develops choreography in both its form and structure.
Content: Styles and techniques in dance are defined by the ways in which the elements of dance and choreographic principles are manipulated in the creation of dance compositions.

1.1.8.A.2Analyze dance techniques and styles to discern the compositional use of the elements of dance and choreographic principles relating to dynamics, as well as to discern spatial relationships.
Content: Acute kinesthetic awareness and mastery of composition are essential for creating and interpreting master works of art.

1.1.12.A.2Categorize the elements, principles, and choreographic structures of dance masterworks.
Content: There are distinct differences between pedestrian movements and formal training in dance.

1.1.2.A.3Demonstrate the difference between pantomime, pedestrian movement, abstract gesture, and dance movement.
Content: Musical and non-musical forms of sound can affect meaning in choreography and improvisation.

1.1.5.A.3Determine how accompaniment (such as sound, spoken text, or silence) can affect choreography and improvisation.
Content: Dance employs various themes and arts media to engage the viewer, develop meaning, and communicate emotions.

1.1.8.A.3Examine how dance compositions are influenced by various social themes and arts media (e.g., dance for camera, interactive, telematics).
Content: Interpretation of dance is heavily reliant on its context.

1.1.12.A.3Analyze issues of gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status, politics, age, and physical conditioning in relation to dance performances.
Content: The coordination and isolation of different body parts is dependent on the dynamic alignment of the body while standing and moving.

1.1.2.A.4Apply and adapt isolated and coordinated body part articulations, body alignment, balance, and body patterning.
Content: Compositional works are distinguished by the use of various body movements and sources of initiation (i.e., central, peripheral, or transverse).

1.1.5.A.4Differentiate contrasting and complimentary shapes, shared weight centers, body parts, body patterning, balance, and range of motion in compositions and performances.
Content: The quality of integrated movement depends on body alignment and the synchronized use of major and minor muscle groups. Variety in body patterns, range of motion, application of the elements of dance, and skill level enhance dance compositions and performance.

1.1.8.A.4Integrate a variety of isolated and coordinated movements in dance compositions and performances, making use of all major muscle groups, proper body mechanics, body patterning, balance, and range of motion.
Content: Artistry in dance performance is accomplished through complete integration of anatomical principles and clear direction of intent and purpose.

1.1.12.A.4Synthesize knowledge of anatomical principles related to body alignment, body patterning, balance, strength, and coordination in compositions and performances.
1.1 The Creative Process All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
B. Music
NOTE: By the end of grade 2, all students progress toward BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in MUSIC. NOTE: By the end of grade 5, all students demonstrate BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in MUSIC. NOTE: By the end of grade 8, those students choosing MUSIC as their required area of specialization demonstrate COMPETENCY in the following content knowledge and skills. NOTE: By the end of grade 12, those students choosing MUSIC as their required area of specialization demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills.
Content: Ear training and listening skill are prerequisites for musical literacy.

1.1.2.B.1Explore the elements of music through verbal and written responses to diverse aural prompts and printed scores.
Content: Reading basic music notation contributes to musical fluency and literacy. Musical intelligence is related to ear training and listening skill, and temporal spatial reasoning ability is connected to listening skill.

1.1.5.B.1Identify the elements of music in response to aural prompts and printed music notational systems.
Content: Common, recognizable musical forms often have characteristics related to specific cultural traditions.

1.1.8.B.1Analyze the application of the elements of music in diverse Western and non-Western musical works from different historical eras using active listening and by reading and interpreting written scores.
Content: Understanding nuanced stylistic differences among various genres of music is a component of musical fluency. Meter, rhythm, tonality, and harmonics are determining factors in the categorization of musical genres.

1.1.12.B.1Examine how aspects of meter, rhythm, tonality, intervals, chords, and harmonic progressions are organized and manipulated to establish unity and variety in genres of musical compositions.
Content: The elements of music are foundational to basic music literacy.

1.1.2.B.2Identify musical elements in response to diverse aural prompts, such as rhythm, timbre, dynamics, form, and melody.
Content: The elements of music are building blocks denoting meter, rhythmic concepts, tonality, intervals, chords, and melodic and harmonic progressions, all of which contribute to musical literacy.

1.1.5.B.2Demonstrate the basic concepts of meter, rhythm, tonality, intervals, chords, and melodic and harmonic progressions, and differentiate basic structures.
Content: Compositional techniques used in different styles and genres of music vary according to prescribed sets of rules.

1.1.8.B.2Compare and contrast the use of structural forms and the manipulation of the elements of music in diverse styles and genres of musical compositions.
Content: Musical proficiency is characterized by the ability to sight-read advanced notation. Musical fluency is also characterized by the ability to classify and replicate the stylistic differences in music of varying traditions.

1.1.12.B.2Synthesize knowledge of the elements of music in the deconstruction and performance of complex musical scores from diverse cultural contexts.
Content: Music is often defined as organized sound that is dependent on predictable properties of tone and pitch. Musical notation captures tonality, dynamic range, and rhythm.

1.1.2.B.3Identify and categorize sound sources by common traits (e.g., scales, rhythmic patterns, and/or other musical elements), and identify rhythmic notation up to eighth notes and rests.
     
Content: Musical instruments have unique qualities of tonality and resonance. Conventional instruments are divided into musical families according to shared properties.

1.1.2.B.4Categorize families of instruments and identify their associated musical properties.
     
1.1 The Creative Process All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
C. Theatre
NOTE: By the end of grade 2, all students progress toward BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in THEATRE. NOTE: By the end of grade 5, all students demonstrate BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in THEATRE. NOTE: By the end of grade 8 those students choosing THEATRE as their required area of specialization demonstrate COMPETENCY in the following content knowledge and skills. NOTE: By the end of grade 12, those students choosing THEATRE as their required area of specialization demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills.
Content: The elements of theatre are recognizable in theatrical performances.

1.1.2.C.1Identify basic elements of theatre and describe their use in a variety of theatrical performances.
Content: The well-made play uses a specific, identifiable narrative structure (e.g., inciting incident, climax, dénouement, etc.).

1.1.5.C.1Evaluate the characteristics of a well-made play in a variety of scripts and performances.
Content: Distinct pieces of dramatic literature and theatrical trends reflect cultural traditions and periods in history.

1.1.8.C.1Analyze the structural components of plays and performances from a variety of Western and non-Western theatrical traditions and from different historical eras.
Content: Theatre and the arts play a significant role in human history and culture.

1.1.12.C.1Analyze examples of theatre’s influence on history and history’s influence on theatre in Western and non-Western theatre traditions.
Content: Theatre artists use precise vocabulary when staging a play.

1.1.2.C.2Express stage directions, areas of the stage, basic stage movements, and parts of a script using correct theatre terms (e.g., setting, costumes, plot, theme, etc.).
Content: The actor’s physicality and vocal techniques have a direct relationship to character development.

1.1.5.C.2Interpret the relationship between the actor’s physical and vocal choices and an audience’s perception of character development by identifying examples of vocal variety, stage business, concentration, and focus.
Content: Actors exercise their voices and bodies through a wide variety of techniques to expand the range and the clarity of the characters they develop.

1.1.8.C.2Determine the effectiveness of various methods of vocal, physical, relaxation, and acting techniques used in actor training.
Content: Characters have physical, emotional, and social dimensions that can be communicated through the application of acting techniques.

1.1.12.C.2Formulate a process of script analysis to identify how the physical, emotional, and social dimensions of a character are communicated through the application of acting techniques.
Content: Creative drama and storytelling use voice, movement, and facial expression to communicate emotions. Creating characters is an act of intention in which actors play themselves in an imaginary set of circumstances.

1.1.2.C.3Distinguish between characters, actors, and the self by demonstrating respect for personal space, creative movement, and pantomime skills while interacting with others in creative drama and storytelling.
Content: Time, place, mood, and theme are enhanced through use of the technical theatrical elements.

1.1.5.C.3Analyze the use of technical theatrical elements to identify how time, place, mood, and theme are created.
Content: Emotion and meaning are often communicated through modulations of vocal rate, pitch, and volume.

1.1.8.C.3Differentiate among vocal rate, pitch, and volume, and explain how they affect articulation, meaning, and character.
Content: Theatre production is an art, but it is also a science requiring knowledge of safety procedures, materials, technology, and construction techniques.

1.1.12.C.3Apply the basic physical and chemical properties (e.g., light, electricity, color, paint, scenic construction, costumes, makeup, and audio components) inherent in technical theatre to safely implement theatre design.
Content: The technical theatrical elements and theatre architecture are inherent in theatrical design and production.

1.1.2.C.4Describe the use of the technical theatrical elements by examining examples of theatrical design in productions.
Content: Sensory recall is a technique actors commonly employ to heighten the believability of a character.

1.1.5.C.4Explain the function of sensory recall and apply it to character development.
Content: A team of artists, technicians, and managers who collaborate to achieve a common goal uses a broad range of skills to create theatrical performances.

1.1.8.C.4Define the areas of responsibility (e.g., actor, director, producer, scenic, lighting, costume, stagehand, etc.) and necessary job skills of the front and back-of-house members of a theatre company.
 
1.1 The Creative Process All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
D. Visual Art
NOTE: By the end of grade 2, all students progress toward BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in VISUAL ART. NOTE: By the end of grade 5, all students demonstrate BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in VISUAL ART. NOTE: By the end of grade 8, those students choosing VISUAL ART as their required area of specialization demonstrate COMPETENCY in the following content knowledge and skills. NOTE: By the end of grade 12, those students choosing VISUAL ART as their required area of specialization demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills.
Content: The basic elements of art and principles of design govern art creation and composition.

1.1.2.D.1Identify the basic elements of art and principles of design in diverse types of artwork.
Content: Understanding the function and purpose of the elements of art and principles of design assists with forming an appreciation of how art and design enhance functionality and improve quality of living.

1.1.5.D.1Identify elements of art and principles of design that are evident in everyday life.
Content: Art is a universal language. Visual communication through art crosses cultural and language barriers throughout time.

1.1.8.D.1Describe the intellectual and emotional significance conveyed by the application of the elements of art and principles of design in different historical eras and cultures.
Content: Common themes exist in artwork from a variety of cultures across time and are communicated through metaphor, symbolism, and allegory.

1.1.12.D.1Distinguish innovative applications of the elements of art and principles of design in visual artworks from diverse cultural perspectives and identify specific cross-cultural themes.
Content: Recognizing the elements of art and principles of design in artworks of known and emerging artists, as well as peers, is an initial step toward visual literacy.

1.1.2.D.2Identify elements of art and principles of design in specific works of art and explain how they are used.
Content: The elements of art and principles of design are universal.

1.1.5.D.2Compare and contrast works of art in various mediums that use the same art elements and principles of design.
Content: The study of masterworks of art from diverse cultures and different historical eras assists in understanding specific cultures.

1.1.8.D.2Compare and contrast various masterworks of art from diverse cultures, and identify elements of the works that relate to specific cultural heritages.
Content: Stimuli for the creation of artworks can come from many places, including other arts disciplines.

1.1.12.D.2Translate literary, musical, theatrical, and dance compositions by using them as stimulus/inspiration for corresponding visual artworks.