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What is a Lighthouse?

What Lighthouses Look Like

Lighthouse Lights

Lighthouse History

Barnegat Lighthouse

Cape May Lighthouse

East Point Lighthouse

Hereford Inlet Lighthouse

Little Egg Harbor (Tucker's Island)

Miah Maull Shoal

Navesink Light (Twin Lights)

Passaic and Bergen Point Lighthouses

Sandy Hook Lighthouse

Sea Girt Lighthouse

 

 

Coloring Book Pages (pdf):

Jaypeg Does the Cape May Lighthouse Windows

Zeero Runs the Lighthouse

 
Cape May Lighthouse
August 2002

There have been three lighthouses in Cape May. In 1823 the first house opened. It was 70 feet high and had a flashing light to distinguish it from a lighthouse across the Delaware Bay. Because of erosion, water surrounded the lighthouse in 1847, and it eventually fell into the ocean. Even today, you can find pieces of the tower that washed up on shore after a storm.

A second lighthouse was built a third of a mile away during 1847. It was demolished ten years later because of poor construction. The third lighthouse is still standing today. It’s 157 feet tall and has 199 steps to the top. It had a very large Fresnel lens. An entire person could stand inside it to refuel the oil lamp.

The last keeper to live in the Cape May Lighthouse was Harry Palmer. He lived there in the 1920s with his wife and nine children. Everybody had a job to do. It was his daughter Alma’s job to pull grass out of the brick paths. To prevent the grass from growing quickly, she salted the cracks. But Alma got in trouble with Harry when the salt left permanent salt stains on the brick!

Next: East Point Lighthouse

Cape May Lighthouse photo

 


 
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