• What is the Board?

    The Board is an abbreviated name for the New Jersey State Board of Mediation, a quasi-judicial administrative agency.  It is charged with administering the New Jersey Employer-Employee Relations Act.  The agency deals with certain labor relations issues involving private sector employers,(such as factories, private hospitals and health care facilities), corporations , private employees, and unions representing private employees.  On very limited bases, the Board handles some public sector cases.  Services include arbitration, mediation, card checks and oversight of the union election process.

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  • What type of allegations does the Board review?

    The Board addresses any private sector labor dispute that involves the need for a third party neutral to serve as an Arbitrator or Mediator on such issues as grievances, contract application, disciplinary appeals, new and renewal contract negotiations, elections and card checks.

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  • What is mediation?

    Mediation is an informal process where a neutral third-party (referred to as a Mediator) assists disputing parties in reaching a mutually acceptable resolution of the dispute.

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  • How does mediation work?

    Mediation sessions are usually held in person at a site agreed to by the parties.  Typically, the mediator will meet privately with each party to more fully explore the facts and issues of each side.  The process continues either across the table (face-to-face) or in a caucus environment.  Shuttle diplomacy is customary as the mediator moves from one side to another with possible settlement proposals.  Upon conclusion of the process, the goal is to move both sides to mutual agreement in the settlement of the dispute or contract language.

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  • How do I request mediation?

    An employer (generally private employer) or a private labor organization (on behalf of an employee) can simply call the NJSBM and request mediation services.  The Board can normally accommodate the request within the timeframe needed.

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  • How much does mediation cost?

    Mediation is available from the NJSBM at no cost to the parties.

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  • Does the Board investigate allegations of discrimination based on race, sex, color, national origin, age, nationality, ancestry, marital status, affectional or sexual orientation, disability status, religion, domestic partnership status or familial status?

    No, the Board has no jurisdiction to enforce statutes regarding discrimination based on any protected class reasons.  Allegations such as these are handled by the New Jersey Division on Civil Rights (609-292-4605) and/or the Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (1-800-669-4000).

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  • Should I contact the Board if I am having problems with pay or overtime compensation?

    No, If you work for a private employer and are having problems with your employer regarding payment of wages, overtime issues, holiday pay or other pay issues, you should contact the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Division of Wage and Hour Compliance.  If you work for a public employer, contact the Federal Wage and Hour Division



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  • Should I contact the Board if I need help with a pension or health benefit issue?

    No, generally, private employees needing help with pension or benefits issues should contact the Human Resources Office or Benefits Officer for the union, if employees are represented by a union.

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  • Does the Board have anything to do with the filing of an Unfair Labor Practice?

    No, All claims of Unfair Labor Practices must be filed with the National Labor Relations Board (1-866-667-6572)

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  • Does the Board enforce Collective Bargaining Agreements?

    No, the Board does not enforce agreements between employers and unions and will not issue a complaint on any charge alleging a breach of such an agreement.  Contracts are generally enforced through negotiated grievance procedures.  Such a complaint may go beyond the grievance procedure to mediation and/or arbitration, if so provided in the agreement.

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Updated: 10/16/2012