Getting Personnel:The Art of Résumé Writing Getting Personnel:The Art of Résumé Writing

Getting Personnel: The Art of Resume Writing

The Rights and Wrongs of Résumé Writing 

  • Include your name, address, phone number and e-mail address at the top of both your resumé and cover letter.
  • Create sections for Education, Work History (include Volunteer Work and Internships), and Computer Skills (including Internet and e-mail knowledge).
  • Include key subjects you've enjoyed (Calculus, Physics, Chemistry, English Literature, and so on).
  • Add extracurricular activities (such as Varsity Football, Lacrosse, Basketball, Cheerleading, and so on), as well as clubs and titles you've held (such as Captain, Class Treasurer, or whatever).
  • Keep your résumé to one page in length.
  • Spell-check and proofread your work before sending your résumé to potential employers.
  • Follow up, ideally over the phone, with hiring managers after you send your résumé, to make sure they received it.
  • Don't use creative graphics or colors in your résumé.
  • Don't send your résumé to a company as an attachment—cut and paste your résumé within the body of the email.
  • Don't send your résumé without a cover letter. Your cover letter introduces the resume' and makes employers want to read more about you.
  • Don't try to send your résumé out to multiple companies without making any changes to your cover letter. If possible, include the contact information of the company you're applying to, as well as the company name and title you're pursuing.
  • Don't write your résumé in the third-person. For example, write your résumé from your point of view, such as "Write weekly news column for school paper" instead of "Writes weekly news column for school paper."
  • Don't attach or include personal information, such as photographs, date of birth, or Website URLs. Keep the résumé professional.
  • Don't forget to post your résumé on job boards like the one on Monster.com— these are free resources available to you that will help you get noticed by hirers!


Source: resume.com