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New Jersey Department of Children and Families Policy Manual

 

Manual:

CP&P

Child Protection and Permanency

Effective

Date:

Volume:

IV

Out of Home Placement

Chapter:

C

Adoption

8-30-2004

Subchapter:

10

Selection Services

Issuance:

100

Selection Consideration and Requirements

 

 

Selection Considerations       5-14-2001

The Division shall not deny to any person the opportunity to become an adoptive parent on the basis of the race, color, or national origin of the person, or of the child involved; or delay or deny the placement of a child for adoption on the basis of the race, color, or national origin of the adoptive parent, or the child involved. Any order of preference for selection based upon race, color, national origin or ethnicity violates the Federal Multiethnic Placement Act (MEPA) of 1994 and the Interethnic Adoption Provisions (IEP) of 1996.

The Division shall not routinely classify children for the purpose of selection of an adoptive home or prospective adoptive parents by race, color, national origin or ethnicity, except for statistical reporting purposes.

The Exchange Unit in the Office of Adoption Operations selects approved adoption homes for children referred from the Local Office’s Resource Units. Selections are made based on the best interests and unique needs of the child awaiting placement and a family’s ability to meet these needs. The available approved home or homes which can best meet these needs is/are selected. The factors that are considered but that do not in and of themselves determine the selections for children include:

      age of child and prospective adoptive parent(s),

      sex of child and preference of prospective adoptive parent(s),

      parenting and role model needs of the child in contrast with the structure and atmosphere of prospective adoptive home,

      child‘s health or physical condition,

      educational, cognitive and psychological needs of child,

      special and/or distinctive needs of the child.

 

Race, color, national origin and ethnicity of the child or the prospective adoptive parent(s) cannot be routinely considered in making selection decisions. Any consideration of race or ethnicity must be done in the context of individualized placement decisions and must pass a strict scrutiny test. This means that only the most compelling reasons may serve to justify consideration of race and ethnicity as part of a placement decision. It is expected that occasions where race or ethnicity lawfully may be considered will be rare. The only exception to this is the case of children subject to the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) of 1978.

Selections are made from a pool of prospective adoptive homes approved by the Local Office’s Resource Units and sent to the Exchange Unit in the Office of Adoption Operations to be matched with children who become available for adoption. There is no guarantee that any given home will ever receive a child.

The Office of Adoption Operations periodically assesses the needs of children available or becoming available for adoption and advises the Local Offices to give priority to the study of applicants who appear to be able to meet the needs of these children.

Efforts to Promote Placing Siblings Together     3-25-2002

The Division makes every effort to place siblings together at any time, including but not limited to, when they:

Enter placement at the same time or approximately the same time,

      Enter placement for the first time, or

      Are moving from an existing placement.

The Division makes every effort to reunite siblings promptly if they are separated, whether the separation is due to a lack of resources to place them together or because they were placed at different times or for different reasons.

For children with the goal of adoption, who have been separated from their siblings who are adopted or pending adoption, the first and priority placement options include:

      The sibling’s foster home (pre-finalization), or

      The sibling‘s adoptive home (foster or select).

Placing siblings together is psychologically beneficial to the children and to their adjustment in placement. It can also facilitate permanency by affording the casework staff the advantage of utilizing the same family history and documentation to develop and carry out the case plan.

 

Exceptions to Sibling Placements        6-24-2002

There are circumstances that may exist when it is not in the child’s best interest to place him/her with a sibling. The Worker/Supervisor assesses and discusses with the Casework Supervisor or LO Manager, as needed, the potential placement and the child‘s circumstances, prior to making a decision. They then determine whether placement with the sibling is in the child’s best interests. Exceptions to placing siblings together include, but are not limited to:

      The capabilities of the potential caregiver in regard to the child needing placement;

      The safety and appropriateness of the home for the child needing placement; and

      The specific circumstances and/or needs of the child needing placement, i.e., the child is bonded to the caregiver in the current placement and the caregiver wants to adopt the child, the case plan is return home or placement with a relative, etc.

Include any exceptions to placing a child in the home of a sibling on the foster home request form, when requesting a foster home placement from the Local Office Resource Family Units.

 

When placement with a sibling is determined not to be the appropriate plan for the child or in the child‘s best interest, document the reasons in the child’s case record.

 

See Determining Appropriateness of Sibling Placements When Foster Home Is at Capacity in CP&P-IV-B-2-200, and Consideration on Disrupting an Existing Placement in an Effort to Promote Sibling Placements in CP&P-IV-B-7-300.

Supports to Enable Adoptive Parents to Consider/Reconsider Accepting New Siblings     6-24-2002

A caregiver‘s decision to not accept additional children into the home is influenced by a variety of factors and can change. It can change when the family’s circumstances change -- for example, if the family moves or the residence becomes more accommodating to the family size. The family‘s relationship with the sibling of a child in placement may become more positive through visits or supports and services to meet the child’s and family‘s needs. The Local Office Worker (with adoptive parents) or the RFSU Facilitator (with active resource family parents who have adopted or are in the process of adopting the sibling) explores with the caregiver the reasons for a decision not to accept the sibling and, in light of those factors and the child’s needs, offers support services that might facilitate placement. Examples of such services include, but are not limited to, the following:

      Day Care or After School Care (only if the caregiver is an employed foster parent);

      Counseling, individual or group;

      Companionship services; and

      Preparation to receive the child, i.e., gradually increasing visitation between the child, sibling and family, and a discussion with the perspective adoptive parents of the child‘s background, personality and special needs, if warranted.

In those cases where select adoptive parents or previously adopting foster parents declined to take a sibling in the past, and the Local Office Worker or RFSU Facilitator learns that the conditions upon which the decision was based have changed, the Local Office Worker reapproaches the adoptive parents (closed select or closed foster homes) or the RFSU Facilitator reapproaches the resource family parents (active homes) and offers them the opportunity to take the child. The following information is provided, as necessary, to enable the select adoptive parents or resource family parents to make an informed decision about whether or not to accept the other child:

      Documentation of the child’s improved behavior or changed condition;

      Implementation of intensive support services to stabilize the child; or

      Availability of support services for the family.

Efforts to Unite Siblings in the Same Adoptive Placement                            6-24-2002

The Local Office Worker has an opportunity to unite siblings in the same placement at any time or whenever there is a need or reason to move a child from his/her current placement and the move is in the child‘s best interest. In order to achieve permanency through adoption, the Local Office Worker may move a child for the following reasons:

      The child is in a resource family home without adoption interest and requires a select adoption home placement.

 

      The child is in a resource family home with adoption interest and the placement discontinues because:

 

-       The resource family parent requests the child’s removal, or

-       The Local Office determines at any time it is in the child‘s best interests to remove and replace the child, i.e., for the purpose of reuniting siblings, the child’s needs can be better met in another placement, etc.

Within the first month of the Local Office case assignment, the Local Office Worker visits the foster home or current placement and begins an ongoing assessment/evaluation of the adoption plan. The Local Office Worker and his Supervisor may find:

      The foster home or current placement to be inadequate for the child‘s needs or unsafe based on an assessment that includes the ability of the caregivers to care for and nurture the child, complete background checks on the caregivers, their biological and adopted children and any other adults living in the home, as well as the application of structured decision making criteria.

 

      The foster home or current placement may adequately meet the child’s needs, but it is in the best interests of the child to move to:

 

-   A sibling‘s foster home (pre-adoption finalization), or

-   A sibling’s adoptive home (foster or select).

 

      The current foster parents or caregivers are not interested in adopting the child.

 

The Local Office Worker completes a written Adoption Assessment and along with their Supervisor decides to proceed with a foster home adoption goal, etc. or considers moving the child to a select placement, or another foster home with adoption interest.

If the Local Office Worker and Supervisor determine that the child needs to be moved, prior to making any placement decisions, including requesting adoption selections from the Exchange Unit in the Office of Adoption Operations (cases with select adoption as the goal), the Local Office Worker completes a search for siblings already in placement. The Local Office Worker documents all search efforts to locate siblings on a CP&P Form 26-52, Contact Sheet, and files it in the case record of the child needing placement.

If a sibling is located in a closed adoptive home (foster or select), the Local Office Homefinding Supervisor notifies the adoptive parent of the child needing placement, unless case practice implications warrant no contact or disclosure of information. Next, determine if the placement is appropriate for the child. If the home is determined inappropriate, the Local Office Supervisor notifies the adoptive parents in writing of the decision not to utilize the home, unless case practice implications warrant no contact or disclosure of information. Document this contact and the reason why the home was not used in the child‘s case record.

In conjunction with the above, follow steps to legally free the child via Termination of Parental Rights (TPR) or Legal Clearance. See CP&P-IV-C-1-500, Termination of Parental Rights (Guardianship), and CP&P-IV-C-1-600, Surrender of Custody and Consent to Adoption.

Search Process for Identifying a Sibling in Placement    6-24-2002

Every time a newborn needs to be placed initially during the intake process or a child moved from their current placement, the Worker:

        Determines if a sibling is in placement by contacting the RFSU to access their internal tracking system for siblings in active, open foster homes currently approved for additional children or siblings in active foster homes not previously approved for additional siblings due to lack of adequate space. If the sibling is in an active foster home which previously lacked adequate space for additional children, the Local Office Worker requests the RFSU determine if the foster home’s current circumstances regarding space have changed. If so, the RFSU reconsiders this home for the Local Office child needing placement, if appropriate.

 

      Completes a computer search in accordance with internal Office of Adoption Operations confidentiality protocol in order to identify any additional siblings who are already adopted and in a closed adoptive home (foster or select) or in a pre-adoptive select home. Documents search efforts to locate siblings on CP&P Form 26-52, Contact Sheet. Files the Contact Sheet and the computer search printout in the case record of the sibling needing placement. (Only the Local Office Homefinding Supervisor, for confidentiality purposes, makes the initial contact with any closed adoptive home (select or foster) that previously adopted a sibling.

 

      Accesses the sibling‘s adoptive parents’ subsidy forms (part of the subsidy record) in order to determine their interest in subsequent sibling placements. Adoptive parents may request not to be contacted.

 

Determining Appropriateness of Sibling Placements   8-30-2004

If a sibling of a child awaiting placement is located in an open and active foster home, the Resource Family Support Unit (RFSU) assesses the home as a possible placement for the child. If necessary, seeks an authorization for an exception to population limitations. See CP&P-IV-B-2-200, Efforts to Promote Placing Siblings Together, and subsequent subsections.

If it is determined that a sibling of a child awaiting placement is in a closed adoptive home (foster or select) or a  pre-adoptive select home, Local Office staff responsible for supervising the home or the area where the family resides, determine if the child awaiting placement can be placed with his/her sibling. Follow steps detailed below.

The Local Office Worker supervising the child needing placement:

      Consults with the Local Office and Local Office Worker, who supervised the home where the sibling was adopted or is currently supervising the sibling in a pre-adoptive placement, to assist with making a decision on whether the adoptive or pre-adoptive parent is capable of parenting another child.

The Local Office supervising the pre-adoptive select home of the sibling or the Area Office covering the area where the sibling‘s closed adoptive home is located:

      Assesses the family’s appropriateness for a sibling placement. This includes a full review of the adoptive foster/select home record.

      Determines whether the adoptive parent is willing and able to accept the new sibling in their home. Only the Local Office Homefinding Supervisor, for confidentiality purposes, makes the initial contact with the select adoptive parents or foster parents who adopted but are no longer active in order to determine their interest in adopting a sibling. See CP&P-IV-C-1-900, Release of Information on Finalized Adoptions.

      Completes an on-site interview with the adoptive parents at their home to verify their living arrangements, to ensure that the home is safe and free of any hazards, and to determine the appropriateness of the placement for the child.

      Completes a formal, written assessment on the family identified and being considered as caregiver for the new sibling. The assessment includes specific information about the caregiver‘s willingness, ability, capacity, and exceptional qualities to parent the additional sibling and to meet the child’s physical and emotional needs. The assessment includes how the other information obtained influenced the Local Office Worker‘s Supervisor’s decision to approve/disapprove the home. The assessment is specific concerning the needs and characteristics of all the children involved, states the benefits of placing the new sibling in the home, and provides explicit detail about the supports needed to facilitate the placement. The assessment addresses whether or not a final decision has been made or if follow up is needed.

      Updates the home study, including requesting current references and medical screenings, if out-of-date.

      Approves or disapproves the home as a placement option for the child, if within population limitations.

      Refers the adoptive family case situation to the Assistant Director, Office of Adoption Operations for review if the adoptive home has reached their population limitations and the placement is determined to be a viable option for the child, as described above. See CP&P-IV-C-10-250, Appendices-Standards for Selected Adoption Homes.

An exception may be authorized for the placement of a specific child (sibling) in an adoptive home only when compelling or exceptional circumstances exist, such as keeping a sibling group together.

Consideration is given to exceeding population limitations (authorizing an exception) only after the Assistant Director, Office of Adoption Operations reviews:

-       The results of a New Jersey Child Safety Assessment (Resource Homes), CP&P Form 22-6, completed within the past three work days by the Office of Adoption Operations’ staff. See CP&P-IV-A-2-100. An exception shall not be authorized if any safety concerns have been identified; and

 

-       The results of the assessment by the Office of Adoption Operations’ staff of the adoptive parents‘ willingness, ability, exceptional qualities, and supports to meet the physical and emotional needs of the child to be placed beyond the population limitations, as well as the other children already in the home, as described in detail previously. Non-CP&P adoption homes require a similar assessment conducted by the supervising, licensed adoption agency. The Assistant Director, Office of Adoption Operations considers any written recommendations in the assessment from non-CP&P professionals and service providers who have worked directly with the adoptive family to meet the needs of the children already placed in the home, if available. This includes teachers, therapists, day care providers and medical professionals, etc.

 

      Contacts the adoptive parent after determining that the potential sibling placement is appropriate and an authorization for an exception to population limitations is granted (if applicable).

 

      Sends a copy of the written assessment and the authorization for an exception to population limitations (if applicable) to the Local Office supervising the child for filing in the child’s case record. The Local Office staff files a copy in the adoptive family‘s case record, if applicable.

 

If it is determined that the sibling’s adoptive placement is the best placement for the child, prior to placing the child in a select home, the child‘s Local Office Worker must ensure that:

 

      The child is legally free by way of a signed Termination of Parental Rights (TPR) order; or

 

      The child is legally free by way of CP&P form 14-86 or 14-86(S), Surrenders of Custody and Consents to Adoption, signed by the parents (known as Legal Clearance approval given by the appropriate Deputy Attorney General); or

 

      The child is granted pre-adoptive approval by the appropriate Local Office Manager, the Area Director, Office of Adoption Operations and the Deputy Attorney General.

 

Alternative, Emergency or Temporary Placement Considerations             3-25-2002

If the child must be moved to an alternative placement prior to the assessment of the sibling’s pre-adoptive or adoptive home, immediately begin an effort to consider placement of the child with his/her sibling.

 

If a child is placed on an emergency basis and it is discovered after the placement that the child has a sibling in a permanent placement, immediately begin to consider placement of the child with his or her sibling in the pre-adoptive or adoptive home.

 

If the RFSU locates a sibling of a child supervised by the LO who needs placement, and the sibling is in an adoptive placement, and permanency through adoption is appropriate for the child who needs placement, the RFSU Facilitator locates a foster home (possibly temporary) until the LO Worker conferences and transfers the case to the Local Office. The Local Office assesses the sibling‘s home and, if the child is not legally free, obtains approval to place the child pending legal clearance, and prepares and moves the child.

 

Under any of the above circumstances, inform the foster parents of the Division’s efforts and intentions to assess and possibly approve the child‘s eventual placement with a sibling.

 

Tracking of Sibling Placements           6-24-2002

Whenever a Local Office child needs to move to another resource placement, the Local Office Worker contacts the appropriate Resource Family Support Unit (RFSU) for a resource family home. The Resource Worker notes any exceptions to placing a child in the home of a sibling on the foster home request form. The RFHUs are responsible for tracking all resource home placements in which the RFSU is unable to facilitate sibling placements and the reasons why, so the issues that prevent sibling placements can be addressed. The RFSU Facilitators indicate on the foster home request form, after all search efforts have been completed, whether or not siblings were located and placement in the sibling’s foster home considered. Homes not approved for sibling placements due to lack of space are noted, i.e., tagged, underscored, marked with an asterisk, etc. Reconsider these homes for future sibling placements if the circumstances change, including the foster parents’ interest in adoption of siblings, adequate space available for an additional child, etc.

 

When completing adoption subsidy forms for adoptive parents, the Local Office Worker notes the adoptive parents’ interest in having siblings, including newborns, who may become available for adoption in the future, placed in their home. Consider these homes when placing subsequent siblings. Make special note of (tag, underscore, mark with an asterisk, etc.) homes that are not able to accept siblings due to lack of space, etc. Check and reconsider these homes for future sibling placements, in the event their circumstances change. Local Office RFSU staff develops an internal system for tracking these homes.

 

The Local Office Worker accesses and reviews this information after completing the computer search for sibling placements.

 

Each time a child moves, or a related or newborn sibling needs placement, the Local Office Homefinding Supervisor contacts the adoptive home of a previously placed sibling, unless the parents have requested no contact. The Local Office Homefinding Supervisor documents this contact and the response in the adoptive parents’ record and the child’s case record.

 

Identify and document in the child‘s case record any case in which the Local Office is unable to complete placement with a sibling and why.

 

Procedures for Promoting Sibling Placements      8-30-2004

Responsibility

Action Required

LO Supervising

the Child

1.Contact the RFSU who accesses their internal tracking system for active, open resource homes approved for additional siblings and those not previously approved for additional siblings due to lack of space. Advise the RFSU on the foster home request form of any exceptions to placing siblings together.

2. Request that the RFSU reconsider the above noted homes for the child needing placement, if appropriate. Place the child, if home is within population limitations.

3. Complete a computer search in accordance with internal Office of Adoption Operations protocol in order to identify any additional siblings already adopted and in a closed adoptive home (foster or select) or in a pre-adoptive select home. Document search efforts to locate siblings on CP&P Form 26-52, Contact Sheet. File the Contact Sheet and the computer search printout in the case record of the child needing placement.

4. Access the sibling’s adoptive parents’ subsidy forms when a child needs to move from their current placement and prior to making any placement decisions including requesting adoptive home selections. (If requesting adoptive home selections from the Office of Adoption Operations include a statement as to the completion of a search for sibling placements and, if applicable, that the adoptive home of the located sibling decided not to accept the new sibling.)  If an alternative or emergency placement is needed, contact the RFSU for a temporary home and begin an effort to facilitate the child’s placement with a sibling as soon as possible.

RFSU

5. Locate temporary alternative placement for the child, if necessary.

Local Office Supervising the Child

6. Consult with the Local Office that supervised the closed adoptive home of the sibling (foster or select) or currently supervising the pre-adoptive select home of the sibling, for assistance in determining whether the parent is capable of parenting another child.

Local Office Homefinding Supervisor

7. Contact the adoptive parents in order to determine their interest in placement of the child, unless case practice implications warrant no contact or disclosure of information. Re-contact them each time the child or a related or newborn sibling needs placement unless requested not to by the adoptive parents. If the home is determined inappropriate, notify the adoptive parents in writing of the decision not to utilize the home, unless case practice implications warrant no contact or disclosure of information. Document this contact and the reason why the home was not used in the child‘s case record.

Local Office Supervising the Family

8. Complete an on-site interview with the adoptive parent at their home to verify their living arrangements, to ensure that the home is safe and free of any hazards, and to assess and determine the appropriateness of the placement for the child. Conduct a full review of the select adoptive/foster home record.

9.  Complete a formal written assessment on the study of the adoptive home, including the decision made to place the new sibling in the home, if within population limitations of the home.

10. Approve or disapprove the home as a placement option for the child, if the home is within population limitations.

RFSU

11. Refer the resource family case situation (if in active status) to the Area Director, overseeing the appropriate RFSU and the Chief of the Office of Licensing if the resource family parent has reached their population limitation. See CP&P-IV-B-2-100, Population Limitations in Resource Home Selection.

Local Office Supervising

the Family

 12. Refer the adoptive family case situation to the Assistant Director, Adoption Operations if the adoptive home has reached their population limitations. See CP&P-IV-C-10-250, Appendices- Standards for Selected Adoption Homes.

Local Office Supervising the Family or RFSU

 13. Complete a New Jersey Child Safety Assessment (Resource Homes), CP&P Form 22-6, within three work days prior to exception being granted. See CP&P-IV-A-2-200.

Office of Licensing

14. Conduct a redetermination that the foster home (if in active status) is large enough for another child, meets sleeping space standards and is in compliance with all other regulations concerning foster homes, if an exception is needed.

RFSU

15. Complete a written assessment of the foster parents’ (if in active status) willingness, ability, and exceptional qualities to meet the physical and emotional needs of the child to be placed and the other children already in the home, if requesting an exception to population limitations. Forward a copy of the assessment to the child‘s Local Office Worker.

Local Office Supervising

the Family

1 16.  Forward a copy of the written assessment of the adoptive parents’ willingness, ability, and exceptional qualities to meet the physical and emotional needs of the child to be placed and the other children already in the home to the Assistant Director, Adoption Operations, if requesting an exception to population limitations.

Assistant Director, Program Operations; Chief, OOL; or Assistant Director, Adoption Operations

17. Review results of the N.J. Child Safety Assessment completed by RFSU, the Office of Licensing‘s redetermination of the resource family home (if applicable), and the RFSU’s staff’s assessment of the foster or adoptive parents’ willingness, ability, and exceptional qualities to meet the child‘s needs, if requesting an exception to population limitations. Authorize an exception to population limitations if all qualifications are met.

Local Office Supervising the Family                                     

18. Contact the adoptive parent after determining that the potential sibling placement is appropriate.

19. Forward a copy of the assessment and the exception (if applicable) to the appropriate LO for filing in the child’s or resource family parents’ case record.

20. File the assessment and the exception (if applicable) in the adoptive parents’ case record.

Local Office Supervising

the Child

21. Proceed to prepare case and place child with sibling, if placement is approved. Prior to placement, ensure that child is legally free or obtain approval to place child in an adoptive home prior to legal clearance. Follow procedures for placing child explained in CP&P-IV-A-4-100, Preparations for Placement.

22. Enter information in the sibling tracking system utilizing the adoption subsidy forms to monitor the adoptive parents’ interest in the future placement of siblings to their child for adoption. Make special note of homes that are not approved due to lack of space, i.e., tag, underscore, mark with an asterisk, etc. Check and reconsider these homes for future sibling placements if circumstances change.

23. Identify and document in the child’s case record any case in which the Local Office is unable to place siblings together and the reasons why.

 

Native American Indian Child     5-14-2001

Selections for a child who is:

 

          either a member of an Indian tribe, or

 

      eligible for membership in an Indian tribe and is the biological child of a member of an Indian tribe is governed by federal law and regulations. The Federal Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 and regulations issued subsequent to the law‘s enactment must be followed in this type of placement.

 

In adoption placement of an Indian child, preference must be given, absent good cause to the contrary, to the placement of the child with:

 

1.    A member of the child’s extended family;

 

2.    Other members of the Indian child‘s tribe; or

 

3.    Other Indian families, including single parent families.

 

Contact the Selection Unit in the Office of Adoption Operations, Cost Code #966, for more specific information regarding the procedures for placing Native American Indian children.

 

Consideration of Race, Color, National Origin or Ethnicity   5-14-2001

In some instances, race, color, national origin or ethnicity may be appropriate for consideration in order to meet the child’s best interests. For example, an older child might express an unwillingness to be placed with a family of a particular race and in this instance the Worker may consider the child‘s wishes in making a placement decision. However, any placement decision must take place in a framework that assesses the strengths and weaknesses of prospective adoptive parents to meet all of the child’s needs so as to provide for the child‘s best interests. Any consideration of race or ethnicity must be narrowly tailored to advancing the child’s interests and must be made as an individualized determination of each child‘s needs and in light of a specific prospective adoptive parent(s)’ capacity to care for that child. It is important to note that a child with documented racial or ethnically related needs may have those needs met in a transracial as well as a same-race placement.

 

The child‘s special or distinctive needs must be documented on the CP&P Form 26-53c, Individual and Family Assessment Outline-Adoption, Child Summary Outline-Part B, Section V, Adoption Placement Issues, by the Worker who addresses the following questions in the documentation:

 

      What are the child’s special or distinctive needs based on race, color or national origin?  Why is it in the child‘s best interests to take these needs into account?

      Can the child’s needs related to race, color, or national origin be taken into account without delaying placement and without placing the child at risk of other harms?

      Why can‘t these needs be met by the prospective adoptive parent who does not share the child’s racial or ethnic background?

      Can these needs be met only by a same race/ethnic placement?

      What are the child‘s other important needs?

 

Requirements for Selection      12-22-2003

Within two months of a child’s legal availability for adoption, the Local Office refers the child to the CO Adoption Unit for selection. In an effort to select the most appropriate home for the child, it is essential that the Adoption Unit have as much available information as possible about him. Submit the following items to the Adoption Unit when requesting a selection:

 

              Individual and Family Assessment Outline, Parts A and B, CP&P Form 26-53c.

 

The child‘s history is presented through the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption, CP&P Form 26-53c. This document is perhaps the most critical document prepared by the adoption worker and one that will have far reaching consequence and use.

 

The child summary is a comprehensive examination of the medical, social, developmental, physical and emotional background of the child. It should be the basis of Life Book work, the principal resource for case planning assessment, and a reference for psychological evaluations. For the Worker or Adoption Homefinder, it is a tool in the selection process. For the prospective adoptive family it is, in conjunction with the oral presentation, the source material for the decision to adopt a particular child. For the adoptive parent, it is the primary reference for responding to the child’s on-going questions about his background, or for exploring the root causes of medical or emotional problems. For the child, it may be the only available document that connects the fact of his birth to the fact of his adoption with a reasonable and sensitive chronological account of events and people. For the Child Placement Review Board, it is the link to the Division and the method by which they can evaluate and assist the Division in pursuing the best placement plan for the child.

 

The Individual and Family Assessment Outline-Adoption, CP&P Form 26-53c must be completed within two months of freeing the child for adoption, but it should be a principal focus of case activity beginning at the time the case is assigned. The more comprehensive the assessment is, the more effective it will be in the adoption process. In preparing the document, the Worker reviews the entire case record, makes note of all appropriate social, emotional and developmental events. Every effort is made to obtain relevant materials such as past medical records, social or medical information on birth parents, grandparents or siblings and additional school or psychological reports as required.

 

A copy of the entire document is submitted to the CPR Board for review. A copy of the document is also submitted to the Central Office Adoption Unit for selection of an adoptive home. Part B only of the assessment is given to prospective adoptive parents at the time of the pre-placement interview and a copy of the Part B, signed by the Worker, Supervisor and adoptive parents is retained in the child‘s case record.

 

Periodic updated information is provided through the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption, CP&P Form 26-53c. The reassessment is a supplement to the assessment and not an independent document. Material in the original assessment need not be repeated in the reassessment. If new information is obtained, it is provided in either the reassessment or through addendum to the original assessment.

 

Adoption Medical Information Form, CP&P Form 14-177.

 

This is a comprehensive medical history report. Collecting and recording the information (which is an on-going process) begins at the point of intake and must be completed by the time that all of the selection material is submitted to the Adoption Unit.

 

Pre-Adoptive Medical Report, CP&P Form 14-126.

 

A completed medical examination by a pediatrician, who is aware that the goal for the child is adoption, is essential for proceeding with the selection process. It should be completed by the time the selection material is submitted to the Adoption Unit. The pediatrician’s evaluation of the child‘s physical condition and potential health problems assists the Adoption Specialist in selecting an appropriate adoptive home. If the physician notes any areas of concern, a prognosis should be included in the report.

 

All recommendations by the pediatrician, such as review by a specialist or treatment for a diagnosed condition, require appropriate follow-up by the Worker as soon as possible. Since acting upon the recommendations made by the physician may be time consuming, submit all available information to the Adoption Unit to avoid delays in selection. When the additional health information becomes available, send it to the Adoption Unit.

Diagnostic tests to be completed with the results recorded on CP&P Form 14-126 include:

 

TB Test (Mantoux, Heaf, or Tine) - this test is only appropriate for children 9 months or older and must be current within the year. Indicate the test given, date and results. If the test results are positive, a chest x-ray report is required.

 

PKU - mandatory for all children under 3 years and for any older children where there is a question of mental retardation.

Sickle Cell Test - required for all black and black/white children over the age of six months. All positive tests must be confirmed by electrophoresis.

 

Serology (mother’s prenatal Wasserman or cord Wasserman) - required for children up to one year of age and for any children over one year of age who have come under the care of CP&P within the last 12 months. Indicate the date and results.

 

HIV Test - children entering pre-adoptive/adoptive placements are tested for HIV infection under the following circumstances:

If the child‘s birth parent (either parent) is or was a member of a risk group. See CP&P-V-A-1-1000 for a list of risk groups;

      If either birth parent died from HIV infection;

 

      At the request of the adoptive parents, if specific information regarding a history of risk is unavailable;

 

      If the parent is thought to be a member of a risk group but is unavailable for interviewing and/or testing;

 

      If the child is sexually active, has been sexually abused, is a substance abuser, or engages in high risk behavior for transmitting HIV infection;

 

      If symptomatic for HIV infection.

 

Any immunizations that the child has received should be noted on CP&P Form 14-126. It is not mandatory that immunizations be completed before sending material to Adoption Operations Unit. However, immunizations must be continued according to EPSDT guidelines and the Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule, while an adoptive home is being selected. See CP&P-V-A-3-800, Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT). Refer to the National Immunization Program website at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/ to view the current Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule.

 

For selected home placements, the physical examination and report, CP&P Form 14-126, must be dated within one month of the time of placement of a child five months of age or younger. The report must be current within two months for children six months and older. For resource parent adoptions, see CP&P-V-A-1-1300.

 

If after receiving the pre-adoptive medical report the Worker has any questions about the medical status of the child, he first discusses the situation with the child’s physician. Consultation, if necessary, is available through the CP&P Child Health Unit.

 

      Psychological or Psychiatric Report

 

If there is any question about the child‘s intellectual potential, behavior or emotional adjustment, a psychological evaluation should be completed. If a child’s birth parents indicates significant history of mental illness or retardation; or the child has been exposed to trauma, parental substance abuse and/or blood lead poisoning, a psychological examination is recommended. In these situations if there is no current (within one year) psychological report, the Worker arranges for an evaluation.

 

This report current within one year should be submitted to the Adoption Unit to aid in the selection of a home that would best meet the needs of the child. A psychological examination is not required before placement if the observations of the Worker, pediatrician, foster parents, school personnel and others indicate that the child is developing normally or if the child is too young to be evaluated properly. The adoptive family should be aware that they have the option of requesting a psychological evaluation at CP&P expense during the time the child is in their home prior to the finalization of adoption. If the adoptive parents are satisfied with the child‘s development and choose to waive the psychological evaluation, obtain a statement to that effect within five months from the date of placement and file it in the child’s case record. See CP&P Form 14-234, Waiver for Psychological Examination. When a pediatrician, psychologist, learning disabilities specialist or other professional recommends the child be evaluated by a psychiatrist, the Worker arranges for the evaluation and forwards the report to the Adoption Unit with the selection material.

 

      Dental Report

 

It is recommended that every child see a dentist at one year of age. It is mandatory that every child under CP&P supervision must receive his/her first dental examination by 3 years of age and an annual examination thereafter. The dental examination should be arranged when needed within two months of the date the case is received in the ARC. The dental report indicating the status of restorative work is submitted with CP&P Form 14-126. The report must be current within 12 months. Dental work does not have to be completed before placement in an adoption home. However, the adoptive parents must be informed about the work that needs to be done. If the child becomes 3 years of age while the material is being prepared for his adoption placement, the dental report requirement may be waived by the Local Office Manager. When the child is placed without a dental examination, this information is given to the adoptive parents.

 

      School Reports

 

School reports should be requested regularly to ensure that the child is receiving an appropriate educational program and that prospective adoptive parents can be given a realistic picture of the child‘s educational capabilities. If a current school report is not in the record, the Worker should request one within two months of the date the case is received in Adoption Operations.

 

      Picture of Child

 

Within three months of the date the case is received in the ARC or by the date the Outline is sent to the CO Adoption Unit, the Worker obtains a picture of the child. When attached to the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption a picture aids in the selection and presentation process. It may be of particular importance for families being considered for non-white children.

 

The CO Adoption Unit begins the selection process upon receipt of the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption. All other appropriate material must be submitted prior to placement. However, if all the information is available to the CO Adoption Unit, it helps the CO Adoption Specialist to select an appropriate home for the child that will best meet his individual needs.

 

Procedures Related to Requirements for Selection      7-29-88

 

RESPONSIBILITY

ACTION REQUIRED

Child’s Worker

1. Complete the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption and forward to the CO Adoption Unit for selection within two months of the child‘s legal availability for adoption.

2. Arrange for child’s pediatric examination and diagnostic tests when appropriate by the time selection material is sent to the CO Adoption Unit.

3. Send Pre-Adoptive Medical Report, CP&P Form 14-126, and other significant data to pediatrician.

4. Follow up on any recommendations by the pediatrician for ongoing treatment or referral to a specialist.

5. Send medical reports to the CO Adoption Unit.

6. Update and complete CP&P Form 14-177, Adoption Medical Information, so it may be included in the selection material forwarded to the CO Adoption Unit.

7. Schedule psychiatric and psychological evaluations when:

-       appropriate in terms of the child‘s behavior, experiences, etc.

-       no current (within one year) report is available.

-       appropriate to litigation efforts.

-       Forward current and any past reports to the CO Adoption Unit.

8. Obtain dental report within two months of case receipt in the ARC when appropriate and forward to the CO Adoption Unit.

9. Review case record for current (within one year) school report. Request school report within two months of the date the case is received in the ARC if new report is needed.

10. Obtain picture of child within three months of the date the case is received in the ARC and forward to the CO Adoption Unit.

11. Coordinate activities with Recruitment Specialist to arrange for newspaper publicity within two months of being notified that there are no homes available.

 

Selection Process and Notification for Children under One Year of Age    3-16-90

The CO Adoption Specialist selects an adoptive family within two weeks of receiving the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption. See Requirements for Selection. The selection is based upon the factors outlined in Selection Considerations and the length of time the couple has been waiting as determined by their date of application. For a child under one year, the longest waiting home (based on date of application) which appears able to accept this child and his particular background will be selected. See Selection of CP&P Employee or Relative of an Employee for requirements when an employee or employee relative is selected as the prospective adoptive home.

 

Notification of the selection is sent to the child’s Local Office with a cover memo, ASU-2, the home study, and all the pertinent material attached. A copy of that memo is sent to the adoptive family‘s Local Office. The covering memo indicates what information is needed prior to the child’s placement in an adoptive home.

 

Within seven working days the Local Office notifies the CO Adoption Unit of the appropriateness of the selection.

 

If the Worker for the child is in agreement with the selection, the child‘s material is released to the family’s Worker within two days after the C.O. Adoption Unit is notified that the selection is appropriate. If the Worker is not in agreement with the selection, refer to Procedures Related to the Director’s Approval to Place a Child Over One Year of Age in an Employee or Relative Home.

 

The procedure for the child four months or younger differs slightly from the procedure for the child five months to twelve months. For the child four months and younger, the ASU-4 notifies the family‘s Local Office of the selection. ASU-3 is used for the child five to twelve months old. The memos instruct the family’s LO of the procedure to follow in advising the family of the selection and the pre-placement interview process. See CP&P-IV-C-6-100. They also indicate what material the child‘s Local Office and adoptive family’s Local Office must submit to the CO Adoption Unit before placement of the child.

 

Procedures Related to the Selection Process and Notification for Children Under One Year of Age    7-29-88

 

RESPONSIBILITY

ACTION REQUIRED

CO Adoption Specialist

1. Select adoptive family within two weeks of receiving the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption, CP&P Form 26-53c.

2. Notify child‘s and adoptive family’s LO’s within two weeks of receiving the selection material. Include home study and all pertinent information.

Child‘s Local Office

3. Review home study and notify the C.O. Adoption Unit within 7 working days if ready to proceed with placement.  See Procedures Related to the Director’s Approval to Place a Child Over One Year of Age in an Employee or Relative Home.

CO Adoption Specialist

4. Release child’s material to the family‘s Local Office within two days of receiving notification of the appropriateness of the selection. Include instructions for adoption placement.

Child’s

5. Submit any outstanding placement material to the C.O. Adoption Unit prior to contacting family.  See Requirements for Selection.

Child‘s Local Office/Adoptive Family’s Local Office

6. Keep the C.O. Adoption Unit informed of any problems in the selection process.

Adoptive Family’s Local Office

7. Submit any material (e.g., updated medical) needed by the Adoption Unit on the family prior to placement.

 

 

Selection Process and Notification for Children Over One Year of Age    5-14-2001

Within two weeks of receiving the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption, the C.O. Adoption Specialist, when possible, selects at least three home studies for the child. The selection is based upon the factors outlined in this policy. The most appropriate and longest waiting homes will be sent to the Local Office for consideration and selection. The number of homes sent is dependent upon the number of homes available and the particular needs of the child.

 

Notification of the selection is sent to the child’s Local Office with a cover memo, ASU-1, the home studies and all pertinent material attached. The cover memo indicates what information is needed prior to placement of the child. It also requests that the Local Office notify the C.O. Adoption Unit of the appropriateness of the selections within two weeks. A copy of the memo indicating the selections is forwarded to each adoptive family‘s Local Office.

 

The child’s Local Office is responsible for determining which of the homes referred best meets the needs of their particular child. The decision is made by reviewing the home studies as well as contacting the families’ Workers for further information if necessary. If the child’s Local Office feels it is impossible to reach a decision without interviewing the individual families involved, they may arrange interviews through the families’ workers. However, since interviews can be a very difficult process for the families, they should only be used in extreme situations. If interviews are required, they must be held and a decision made within one month of receiving the selections from the Selection Unit in the Office of Adoption Operations.

 

The child’s Worker must document the reason for selecting a particular home for the child. The documentation must include all the factors considered in reaching the decision. The documentation focuses on the individual child‘s needs and the prospective adoptive parent(s)’ abilities and capacity to meet and address those individual needs and, therefore, to care for that child. In the rare situation in which race, color, national origin or ethnicity is considered based on a specific child‘s needs, detailed documentation is imperative.

 

The child’s Local Office advises the Exchange Unit when a final decision is made. The Adoption Specialist sends the child‘s material with ASU-3 to the Worker of the selected family. This memo indicates the material needed for the child and family before placement can occur. The Adoption Specialist releases the non-selected homes for consideration for other children.

 

Procedures Related to the Selection Process and Notification for Children Over One Year of Age     5-14-2001

 

RESPONSIBILITY

ACTION REQUIRED

C.O. Adoption Specialist

1. Selects at least three homes, when possible, within two weeks of receiving the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption.

2. Send Adoption Selection Notice for Child Over One Year, ASU-1, with home studies and pertinent information to child’s Local Office.

Child‘s Worker/ Supervisor

 

3. Review home studies.

4. Contact Workers of families when necessary.

5. Select appropriate family. Document the reasons for the selection and file the written documentation in the child’s case record.

6. Advise C.O. Adoption Specialist of final selection within two weeks of receiving home studies.

7. Submit any outstanding placement material to the C.O. Selection Unit prior to proceeding with placement.  See Requirements for Selection.

C.O. Adoption Specialist

8. Send child‘s material with Instructions for Adoption Placement of Child Five Months and Older, ASU-3, to the Worker of the selected family within 2 days of notification of the selection.

Adoptive Family’s LO

9. Submit any material needed by the CO Adoption Unit on the family prior to proceeding with placement.

 

 

Selection of CP&P Employee or Relative of an Employee   3-16-90

When the home of a CP&P employee or a relative of an employee, has been approved by CP&P as an adoptive home and the home is subsequently selected for the placement of a child, the Director‘s approval to proceed with placement is required. The purpose of this approval is to protect both the employee/relative and the Division by assuring that preferential treatment has not been given. See CP&P-IV-C-10-200 for a definition of relatives.

 

The employee or relative of the employee and the family’s Local Office are informed when the request for Director‘s approval is made. Follow the selection and notification process for children under and over one year of age as outlined elsewhere in this policy with the addition of the following requirements:

 

•     When selected by the Central Office Adoption Unit as the longest waiting home for a child under one year old, the Director’s approval to proceed with placement is required after the child‘s Local Office has concurred with the selection.

 

•     When sent to the child’s LO by the Central Office Adoption Unit as one of three longest waiting homes for a problem free child over one year old, the Director‘s approval is required only if the Local Office chooses the employee or employee relative home for the child.

 

•     When sent to the child’s Local Office by the Office of Adoption Operations as one of three or more homes appearing most suitable for a special needs child regardless of application date, the Director‘s approval is required only if the home is chosen by the Local Office for the child.

 

Procedures Related to the Director‘s Approval to Place a Child Under One Year of Age in an Employee or Relative Home     3-16-90

 

RESPONSIBILITY

ACTION REQUIRED

CO Adoption Specialist

1. Review and select a family for a child. Note whether the selection is an employee or employee’s relative.

2. Forward a copy of the employee‘s or employee relatives’ home study, the child‘s Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption, CP&P Form 26-53c, and a cover memo stating why selection of the adoptive family is appropriate for the child to the CP&P Director.

3. Notify the employee or relative and the family’s Local Office that the request for approval to place has been sent to the CP&P Director.

CP&P Director

4. Review all materials submitted to determine that preferential treatment is not being given to applicants.

5. Approve or disapprove, within one week selection of the adoptive home and inform the CO Adoption Specialist.

CO Adoption Specialist

6. Document the Director‘s approval disapproval in the home file.

7. For selections approved by the CP&P Director, notify child’s and adoptive family‘s Local Office within one week of receiving the Director’s response. Include home study and all pertinent information.

8. Continue with procedures as outlined in this policy.

 

Procedures Related to the Director‘s Approval to Place a Child Over One Year of Age in an Employee or Relative Home           3-16-90

 

RESPONSIBILITY

ACTION REQUIRED

CO Adoption Specialist

1. For a child without significant problems over one year, within two weeks of receiving the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption select the three longest waiting appropriate homes and identify any one of the homes as an employee or employee relative home. For a hard to place child over one year old, select the three (or more) most appropriate homes according to the needs of the child.

2. Send Adoption Selection Notice for Child Over One Year, ASU-1, with home studies and pertinent information to child’s Local Office.

Child‘s Local Office

3. Review home studies.

4. Contact Workers of families when necessary.

5. Select appropriate family.

6. Advise CO Adoption Specialist of final selection within 10 days of receiving home studies.

C.O. Adoption Specialist

7. When the selected family is an employee or employee relative, forward a copy of the employee’s or employee relative‘s home study, the child’s Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption, and a cover memo stating why selection of the adoptive family is appropriate for the child to the CP&P Director.

8. Notify the employee or employee relative and the family‘s Local Office that the request for approval to place has been sent to the CP&P Director.

CP&P Director

9. Review all materials submitted to determine that preferential treatment is not being given to the applicants.

10. Approve or disapprove selection of the adoptive home and inform the CO Adoption Specialist.

CO Adoption Specialist

11. Document the Director’s approval disapproval in the home file.

12. For selections approved or disapproved by the CP&P Director, notify child‘s and adoptive family’s Local Office as quickly as possible but no later than one week after receiving the Director‘s response.

13. For placements which are disapproved by the CP&P Director, contact the child’s Local Office to determine whether additional selections need to be forwarded for consideration.

14. Continue with procedures as outlined above.

 

 

Selection Differences      3-16-90

If the Workers and Supervisors involved do not feel the home studies selected are appropriate, they should be returned to the CO Adoption Unit indicating why they are not being considered. A home may only be rejected for a child if it can be documented that it cannot meet the child‘s needs. If the reasons given for rejection do not appear justified, the CO Adoption Unit will discuss the case with the Local Office Manager. If necessary, the CO Adoption Unit Supervisor will refer the case to the Supervisor of Field Operations, Office of Policy, Planning and Support for resolution.

 

Communication Between the LO and the CO Adoption Unit Regarding Selections       7-29-88

Communication between the LO and the CO Adoption Unit is essential to the selection process running smoothly. It is in the best interests of the children and families involved if the following guidelines and time frames are adhered to:

 

•     After receiving a selection, the child’s Local Office informs the CO Adoption Unit as soon as possible but no later than seven working days for children under one year of age, and ten working days for children over one year of age as to the appropriateness of the selection. If the Worker finds it necessary to interview each family selected for the child, he or she arranges this through the family‘s worker and notifies the CO Adoption Unit within one month as to which family the child’s Local Office has selected.

 

•     If a selected family does not result in a placement, the child‘s Local Office advises the CO Adoption Unit in writing within five days of the decision and requests another selection.

 

•     If a placement disrupts, the Local Office supervising the placement Adoption Disruption Report, CP&P Form 14-174. Indicate if a new selection is needed now or in the future.

 

•     If a child is referred to the CO Adoption Unit but the child’s Worker is already considering a family (e.g., someone who has seen the child at an adoption party), the CO Adoption Unit will not proceed with a selection. Notify the CO Adoption Unit in writing of the need for a home within one week of the decision not to proceed with the family originally being considered.

 

•     Telephone requests for a selection are discouraged. However, in an emergency situation the CO Adoption Unit will select a home based on material shared over the phone. In all situations in which selections are made by telephone the Local Office sends all appropriate written referral material to the CO Adoption Unit as soon as possible but no later than one month from the date of the telephone request.

 

•     Send the CO Adoption Unit written notice of any placement within one week of the placement. All home studies of non-selected families should be returned. Record placement on the Adoption Processing List.

 

•     If adoption is no longer the current plan for a child, such as when placement in a residential setting occurs, send the CO Adoption Unit written notice within one week of the decision.

 

•     If during future planning, adoption is again determined to be the goal for the child, notify the C.O. Adoption Unit in writing and provide written updated material on the child so that the CO Adoption Unit can initiate selection efforts.

 

Waiting Children     7-29-88

When a child is referred to the CO Adoption Unit for selection and no CP&P home is available for consideration, the C.O. Adoption Specialist refers the child to the New Jersey Adoption Resource Exchange (NJARE). If there are no appropriate homes available through NJARE, the child is referred immediately to Spaulding for Children of New Jersey, Children‘s Aid and Adoption Society, the National Adoption Exchange (NAE), the Delaware Valley Adoption Exchange (DARE) and the CAP BOOK, Inc. The child’s material is also sent to any agency with which the Division has a purchase of adoption service contract. See CP&P-IV-C-1-1000, New Jersey Adoption Resource Exchange.

 

When a child is waiting for a home, the Worker updates his material every six months and sends it to the C.O. Adoption Unit. Updates may be made by completing the Individual and Family Reassessment Outline - Adoption. The C.O. Adoption Unit shares the information with the NJARE. A current photograph should also be sent to the C.O. Adoption Unit annually for exchange and publicity purposes.

 

The Worker in conjunction with the recruitment specialist in the Local Office is responsible for developing recruitment opportunities in the newspaper and other available media for the waiting child. Within two months of being notified by the CO Adoption Unit that no homes are available for the child and that he is registered on the exchange, arrangements should be made for the child to be featured in a newspaper waiting children‘s column.

 

If the plan for a waiting child changes and a selected adoption home is no longer needed, the Local Office advises the Adoption Unit within one week. Similarly the CO Adoption Unit should be advised in writing if a child again needs a home. This would include situations such as children going into residential treatment where immediate plans for adoption placement would be discontinued, but where a sponsor home might be desired or where the child would later become ready for adoption placement.

 

Procedures Related to Waiting Children     10-15-86

 

RESPONSIBILITY

ACTION REQUIRED

Child’s Worker

1. Send the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption, CP&P Form 26-53c to the CO Adoption Unit.

CO Adoption Specialist

2. Refer the child to the New Jersey Adoption Resource Exchange within five days of receiving the Individual and Family Assessment - Adoption Outline if no appropriate home is available.

Child‘s Worker

3. Coordinate activities with Recruitment Specialist to arrange for newspaper publicity within two months of being notified that there are no homes available and that the child has been registered on the exchange.

4. Complete the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption, CP&P Form 26-53c, every 6 months and send it to the CO Adoption Unit along with a current photograph.

5. Send the CO Adoption Unit written notice if adoption plans change for the child.

Local Office Adoption Specialist

6. Advise the Exchange of any changes in the child’s status.

 

Unborn Children      10-15-86

Selections are not routinely made for unborn children because of the delays often encountered in obtaining legal clearance. However, if the circumstances indicate that legal clearance is likely to be obtained quickly, the CO Adoption Unit may select a family at the Worker‘s request once he has received Part A of the Individual and Family Assessment Outline - Adoption. The Worker should telephone the CO Adoption Unit to notify them of the birth of the child and forward the appropriate materials outlined in this policy within two weeks.

 

Out-of-State Placements      10-15-86

See CP&P-VIII-D-2-600 and CP&P-VIII-D-2-700.

 

Non-CP&P Home     10-15-86

If the Local Office learns of a potential home from another agency for one of their waiting children, the selection must be cleared through the CO Adoption Unit before the family can be contacted. The CO Adoption Unit requires a copy of the family’s home study as well as the child‘s placement material to give approval to proceed. The CO Adoption Unit will explore the private agency’s fee and take the necessary steps to have it approved by the CP&P Director. If the home is located out of state, approval must be obtained through the Interstate Services. See CP&P-VIII-D-2-700.