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State of New Jersey-Department of Environmental Protection-Division of Water Monitoring and Standards
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Bureau of Freshwater & Biological Monitoring
Chemical/Physical Monitoring; Rivers and Streams

Completed Projects

Below is a list of completed projects conducted as part of the Bureau’s Chemical/Physical monitoring program that are no longer active. All data from these projects are available through the National Water Quality Portal. Click on a project below to learn more.



Duration/Time Period: 1997-2010

Objective: As part of this network, 40 macroinvertebrate sampling locations were selected randomly (2 from each of the State’s 20 watershed management areas) so the chemical/physical monitoring would coincide with biological sampling. Stations monitored quarterly, for field, nutrient/conventional and metals parameters.

Statewide Status sites were replaced in 2010 with HUC14 Assessment sites at the request of the Bureau of Environmental Analysis Restoration and Standards due to adjustments in assessment priorities.

Duration/Time Period: 2010-2015

Objective: As part of this network, ~40 monitoring locations were selected at the pour point of watersheds (HUC14s) in which little or no chemical/physical monitoring had been done previously or in watersheds which were assessed as having biological impairments, but lacked chemical/physical data. Stations monitored quarterly, for field, nutrient/conventional and metals parameters.

In 2015, these sites were replaced in the network by probabilistic monitoring sites. The 39 HUC14 sites sampled in 2015 were sampled for an additional year in 2016 as their own project (HUC14 Assessment Monitoring Project).


Duration/Time Period: 2016

Objective: Completion of monitoring effort which began as part of this netwrok. ~40 monitoring locations were selected at the pour points of watersheds (HUC14s) in which little or no chemical/physical monitoring had been done previously or in watersheds which were assessed as having biological impairments, but lacked chemical/physical data. Stations monitored quarterly, for field, nutrient/conventional and metals parameters.


Duration/Time Period: 2000-2004

Objective: To supplement the Ambient Surface Water Quality Monitoring Network and to enhance statewide coverage. ~200 sites (~100 sites in half of the State’s watershed management areas sampled from 2000-2002 and the other ~100 in the other half from 2002-2004) were monitored quarterly for field, nutrient/conventional and metals parameters. Sites were selected through an extensive stakeholder process in each watershed management area.

Network was renamed Supplemental Ambient Surface Water Monitoring Network in 2005.


Duration/Time Period: 2005-2013

Objective: To enhance spatial coverage of the Ambient Surface Water Quality Monitoring Network, the network is using some sites derived from the older Existing Water Quality Network and new sites requested by the Bureau of Environmental Analysis Restoration and Standards. ~ 100 sites sampled quarterly for field, nutrient/conventional and metals parameters. In 2011, number of stations reduced to 70 to focus resources on Barnegat Bay watershed sampling. At this time, 40 sites replaced with probabilistic sites have been selected using Generalized Random Tessellation Stratified survey design.

Replaced with Regional Targeted Water Quality Network.


Duration/Time Period: 2013-2015

Objective: To continue monitoring probabilistic stations selected as part of the Supplemental Ambient Surface Water Monitoring Network in 2011. In 2013, 11 stations were added to bring the total to 51. Stations were sampled quarterly for field, nutrient/conventional and metals parameters. At this time biological sampling, (macroinvertebrate and where possible fish) was also conducted at these locations.

In 2015, probabilistic monitoring was incorporated into the Ambient Surface Water Quality Monitoring Network to better align statewide monitoring networks.


Duration/Time Period: 1997-2011

Objective: Follow-up monitoring to confirm or supplement legacy data at locations which were assessed as being impaired. The number of stations and sampling frequency varied from year to year, due to the data needs of the Bureau of Environmental Analysis Restoration and Standards. 303d monitoring was conducted in all watershed management areas except WMA16 (no data requested in this area). Sampling included both base flow and elevated flow requirements and parameters included field, nutrients/conventionals and metals.


Duration/Time Period: 2002-2006

Objective: Follow-up monitoring to evaluate total maximum daily load implementation. The number of stations and sampling frequency varied from year to year due to the data needs of the Bureau of Environmental Analysis Restoration and Standards. Parameters and sampling frequency were dependent on specific waterbodies targeted. Waterbodies /watersheds sampled included Cooper River, Pennsauken Creek, Raccoon Creek, Hammonton Creek, Shark River, and Rancocas Creek.


Duration/Time Period: 2005-2011

Objective: Collect water quality samples in surface waters which are used as drinking water sources. The drinking water sources selected were those which had little or dated water quality information. Of particular interest were metals parameters, but field and conventional/nutrient parameters were sampled for as well. Sampling was generally conducted quarterly for two-year periods.


Duration/Time Period: 2002

Objective: Monitor water quality during drought conditions in selected water bodies used as drinking water sources. Weekly sampling included field, and nutrient/conventional parameters, and continuous monitoring was conducted at some locations.


Duration/Time Period: 2009-2016

Objective: To collect qualitative periphyton/diatom samples to be used to evaluate the potential development of a biological condition gradient. Selection of sites included both northern and southern sites where pH levels were above 5.5.


Duration/Time Period: 1997-2012

Objective: Using continuous monitoring (deployment of data sondes), dissolved oxygen (as well as specific conductance, water temperature, pH and in some cases turbidity) was measured every 30-60 minutes over several days to determine diurnal fluctuations. Site selection was determined by discrete samples which suggested dissolved oxygen levels may be of concern.

In 2013, this project became the Short-term Continuous Monitoring Project, and then was discontinued as its own project in 2014. Beginning in 2014, continuous monitoring was incorporated into other existing networks.


Duration/Time Period: 2013

Objective: Using continuous monitoring (deployment of data sondes and loggers) dissolved oxygen (as well as specific conductance, water temperature, pH and, in some cases, turbidity) was measured every 30-60 minutes over several days to determine diurnal fluctuations. Site selection was determined by discreet samples which suggested parameter levels may be of concern.

Beginning in 2014, continuous monitoring was incorporated into other existing networks.


Duration/Time Period: 2005-2013

Objective: Using continuous monitoring (deployment of data loggers), stream temperature was recorded every 30-60 minutes over several weeks or months during the summer to evaluate diurnal fluctuations in water temperature. Site selection mainly focused on trout production, trout maintenance or category 1 waters.

Beginning in 2014, continuous monitoring was incorporated into other existing networks.

 
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