Measles Archive


April 2019: Potential NJ Measles Exposure in Middlesex, Ocean Counties

The New Jersey Department of Health is warning residents about a confirmed case of measles in a New York City resident who potentially exposed individuals in Middlesex and Ocean counties on April 22 and 23.  

Anyone who visited the following locations may have been exposed to measles:

  • Sky Zone, 600 Hadley Rd, South Plainfield, NJ 07080
    • April 22 from 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
  • River 978 Banquet Hall, 978 River Ave, Lakewood, NJ 08701
    • April 23 from 6:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. (April 24)

The Department recommends that anyone who visited the locations listed above during the specified dates/times should contact a health provider immediately to discuss potential exposure and risk of developing the illness. If you have been exposed, you are at risk if you have not been vaccinated or have not had measles. Individuals potentially exposed on these dates, if infected, could develop symptoms as late as May 14.

Anyone who suspects an exposure is urged to call a health care provider before going to a medical office or emergency department. Special arrangements can be made for evaluation while also protecting other patients and medical staff from possible infection.

 

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April 2019: Potential Measles Exposures in Monmouth County Related to Highly Suspect Case

NOTE: Based upon additional testing at the CDC, this highly suspect case was determined not to have measles.

The New Jersey Department of Health is warning residents of a highly suspect case of measles — a very contagious disease — in a Middlesex County resident who may have exposed individuals in Monmouth County on April 17 and 19. The Department and local health officials are investigating any connection to the current Ocean County measles outbreak or outbreaks in other states.

Individuals who visited the following locations only at the times and dates specified below may have been exposed to measles.  There is currently no ongoing risk of transmission at these locations.

  • Rosalita’s Roadside Cantina, 180 Route 9 North, Englishtown, NJ 07726
    • April 19 between 11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
  • LabCorp, 83 Bridge Plaza Dr, Manalapan, NJ 07726
    • April 17 between 7:15 a.m. and 10:00 a.m.
    • April 19 between 11:15 a.m. and 1:50 p.m.

The Department is working in collaboration with local health officials to identify and notify people who might have been exposed during the time the individual was infectious. This investigation is in progress. In the event that additional exposure locations are identified, this list above will be updated.

The Department recommends that anyone who visited the locations listed above during the specified dates/times should contact a health provider immediately to discuss potential exposure and risk of developing the illness. If you have been exposed, you are at risk if you have not been vaccinated or have not had measles. Individuals potentially exposed on these dates, if infected, could develop symptoms as late as May 10.

 

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2019 Measles Outbreak, Ocean County

Between March 2019 and May 2019, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) and local health officials worked together to investigate an outbreak of measles. A total of 12 outbreak-associated cases were identified, including 8 confirmed cases in Ocean County residents and 4 cases in one Monmouth County household that had a direct epidemiologic link to the outbreak community. As of May 16, two incubation periods (a total of 42 days) have passed from the last day the last known case was infectious. Because no new cases have been identified during this period, the New Jersey outbreak is being considered over.

All Cases associated with the 2019 Ocean County outbreak were either unvaccinated or had unknown vaccination status (no documentation of measles-containing vaccine). Cases ranged in age from 5 months to 51 years and had rash onset dates that spanned from February 28 to March 30. A full list of previous outbreak-associated exposure locations can be found here

However, in light of recent measles cases/exposures and ongoing measles outbreaks in surrounding communities, the Department urges providers to maintain vigilance for suspect cases of measles and have a high index of suspicion for measles in persons with a clinically compatible illness.

Anyone who suspects an exposure is urged to call a health care provider before going to a medical office or emergency department. Special arrangements can be made for evaluation while also protecting other patients and medical staff from possible infection.

The Department continues to recommend that providers ensure that patients are fully vaccinated according to the U.S. immunization schedule and consider administering MMR vaccine in certain circumstances as described in the 2019 Measles Outbreak Information for Clinicians

 

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February 2019: New Jersey Department of Health Warns Residents of 4 Confirmed Measles Cases

The New Jersey Department of Health is warning residents about 4 confirmed cases of measles. In unrelated incidents:

  • A Bergen County resident developed measles after contact with a community outside New Jersey experiencing an ongoing outbreak of measles and potentially exposed individuals in Bergen County;
  • An Essex County resident developed measles following travel from a country that is currently experiencing an ongoing outbreak of measles; and
  • 2 Ocean County residents were confirmed to have measles and potentially exposed individuals in Ocean County between February 26 and March 5.

The Department and local health officials are investigating whether there is any connection between the recent Ocean County cases, the previous outbreak in Ocean County, or current outbreaks in other states.

The Department recommends that anyone who visited the locations listed below during the specified dates/times should contact a health provider immediately to discuss potential exposure and risk of developing the illness. If you have been exposed, you are at risk if you have not been vaccinated or have not had measles. Potentially exposed individuals, if infected, could develop symptoms as late as March 26. As of March 8, no additional associated cases have been identified.

Measles symptoms include a high fever, cough, runny nose, watery red eyes and a rash that usually appears between three and five days after symptoms begin. The rash usually begins as flat red spots that appear on the face at the hairline and spread downward to the neck, torso, arms, legs and feet. It can cause serious complications such as pneumonia and encephalitis (swelling of the brain). Measles infection in a pregnant woman can lead to miscarriage, premature birth or a low-birth-weight baby. Measles is easily spread through the air when someone coughs or sneezes. People can also get sick when they come in contact with mucus or saliva from an infected person.

If you develop symptoms of measles, the Department recommends that you call a health care provider before going to a medical office or emergency department. Special arrangements can be made for evaluation while also protecting other patients and medical staff from possible infection.

 Anyone who visited the following locations may have been exposed to measles:

  • AFC Urgent Care Hillsdale, 2 Broadway, Hillsdale, NJ 07642
    • February 18, 2019 from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
  • Walgreens Pharmacy, 383 Washington Ave, Hillsdale, NJ 07642 
    • February 18, 2019 from 3:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
  • Congregation Sons of Israel- Park Avenue, 401 Park Ave, Lakewood, NJ 08701
    • February 26, 2019 from 5:30 p.m. to 8:15 p.m.
  • Kol Shimshon, 323 Squankum Rd, Lakewood, NJ 08701
    • February 27, 2019 from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
  • LabCorp, 1352 River Avenue, Lakewood, NJ 08701
    • March 5, 2019 from 3:45 p.m. to close

The Department is working in collaboration with local health officials to notify people who might have been exposed and identify additional exposures that could have occurred. In the event that additional exposures are identified, an update will be provided.

For more information about what to do if you’ve been exposed to measles, visit the Department's measles factsheet. The CDC has additional information available here

 

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2018 Measles Outbreak, Ocean County

Between October 2018 and January 2019, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) and local health officials worked together to investigate an outbreak of measles. As of January 16, two incubation periods (a total of 42 days) have passed from the last day the last known case was infectious.

A total of 33 outbreak-associated cases were identified, including 30 confirmed cases in Ocean County residents and 3 cases in one Passaic County household that had a direct epidemiologic link to the outbreak community.

  • Rash onset date range: October 17 to November 30
  • Age range: 6 months to 59 years, 88% of cases were 18 years of age or younger
  • Vaccination status: 82% of cases had no documentation of measles-containing vaccine; 3% had 1 documented dose; and 15% had 2 documented doses

A full list of previous 2018 outbreak-associated exposure locations can be found here 

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June 2018: New Jersey Department of Health Warns Residents of Measles Case

Individual possibly exposed others to measles while in Burlington, Camden counties

The New Jersey Department of Health is warning residents about a measles case in an individual who could have possibly exposed others to the infection while in Burlington and Camden counties. The individual developed symptoms after international travel.

The Department recommends that anyone who visited the locations listed below during the specified dates/times should contact a health provider immediately to discuss potential exposure and risk of developing the illness. If you have been exposed, you are at risk if you have not been vaccinated or have not had measles. Potentially exposed individuals, if infected, could develop symptoms as late as July 11. As of June 27, no additional cases associated with the exposures occurring in Burlington and Camden counties have been identified.

Measles symptoms include a high fever, cough, runny nose, watery red eyes and a rash that usually appears between three and five days after symptoms begin. The rash usually begins as flat red spots that appear on the face at the hairline and spread downward to the neck, torso, arms, legs and feet. It can cause serious complications such as pneumonia and encephalitis (swelling of the brain). Measles infection in a pregnant woman can lead to miscarriage, premature birth or a low-birth-weight baby. Measles is easily spread through the air when someone coughs or sneezes. People can also get sick when they come in contact with mucus or saliva from an infected person.

If you develop symptoms of measles, the Department recommends that you call a health care provider before going to a medical office or emergency department. Special arrangements can be made for evaluation while also protecting other patients and medical staff from possible infection.

 Anyone who visited the following locations may have been exposed to measles:

  •  LifeTime Mount Laurel, 3939 Church Rd., Mount Laurel, NJ 08054
    • June 12 between 6 a.m. and 9:30 p.m.
    • June 13 between 6 a.m. and 4 p.m.
    • June 14 between 6 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
    • June 15 between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m.
  • The Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center, 1865 Harrison Ave. Camden, NJ 08105 on June 14 between 2:45 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
  • Cooper University Family & Community Medical Center in Camden, 1865 Harrison Ave. Camden, NJ, 08105 on June 14 between 2:45 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
  • Virtua Express Urgent Care - Moorestown, 401 Young Ave, Suite 108, Moorestown, NJ, 08057 on June 16 between 11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
  • Virtua Marlton Hospital, 90 Brick Rd, Marlton, NJ, 08053 on June 17 between 8:45 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Virtua is in the process of contacting those individuals who were potentially exposed at its facilities.

The Department is working with local health officials to identify and notify people who might have been exposed during the time the individual was infectious.

"Two doses of measles vaccine are about 97 percent effective in preventing measles,” said Dr. Christina Tan, state epidemiologist. “We urge everyone to check to make sure they and their family members are up-to-date on measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine and all other age-appropriate immunizations. Getting vaccinated not only protects you, it protects others around you who are too young to get the vaccine or can’t receive it for medical reasons.”

“If you’re planning an international trip, the World Health Organization recommends that adults or adolescents unsure of their immune status get a dose of measles vaccine before traveling,” Dr. Tan added.

Before international travel:

  • Infants 6 through 11 months of age should receive one dose of MMR vaccine. Infants who get one dose of MMR vaccine before their first birthday should get two more doses (one dose at 12 through 15 months of age and another dose separated by at least 28 days).
  • Children 1 year and older should receive two doses of MMR vaccine, separated by at least 28 days.
  • Teenagers and adults who do not have evidence of immunity against measles should get two doses of MMR vaccine separated by at least 28 days.

For more information about what to do if you’ve been exposed to measles, visit the Department's measles factsheet. The CDC has additional information available here

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May 2017: New Jersey Confirms Travel-Related Measles Case in Bergen County

Contact A Health Care Provider If You Suspect Exposure

A travel-related case of measles – a highly contagious disease – has been confirmed in a 16-year old who traveled to the United States on vacation. The person may have exposed others in New Jersey while visiting between May 12 - 15 while infectious.

People exposed to this person in New Jersey could develop symptoms as late as June 5.

The person stayed at the Ramada Rochelle Park, 375 West Passaic Street in Rochelle Park. Persons who visited the Ramada on May 12 until 11 AM on May 13 might have been exposed to measles.

The teenager was hospitalized at The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, and may have exposed people from 9am on May 13 until 1am on May 14; and also on May 15 from 3 to 5 pm. Persons who visited the hospital between these dates and times might have been exposed to measles.

The Valley Hospital is in the process of contacting those individuals who were potentially exposed. The Department of Health is working with local health officials to identify and notify people who might have been exposed during the time the person was infectious. Anyone who suspects an exposure is urged to call a health care provider before going to a medical office or emergency department. Special arrangements can be made for evaluation while also protecting other patients and medical staff from possible infection.

Measles symptoms include rash, high fever, cough, runny nose and red, watery eyes. It can cause serious complications such as pneumonia and encephalitis (swelling of the brain). Measles infection in a pregnant woman can lead to miscarriage, premature birth or a low-birth-weight baby. Measles is easily spread through the air when someone coughs or sneezes. People can also get sick when they come in contact with mucus or saliva from an infected person.

Anyone who has not been vaccinated or has not had measles is at risk if they are exposed.

People who travel internationally or who come in contact with international travelers are at particular risk for exposure to measles. Measles remains a common disease in many parts of the world, including areas in Europe, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa. “A dose of measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for all children 12 to 15 months of age with a second shot recommended at 4 – 6 years of age,” said Assistant Commissioner Dr. Christina Tan, state epidemiologist. “The CDC also recommends that all people 6 months of age and older who will be traveling internationally be protected against measles.”

Before international travel:

  • Infants 6 through 11 months of age should receive one dose of MMR vaccine. Infants who get one dose of MMR vaccine before their first birthday should get two more doses (one dose at 12 through 15 months of age and another dose separated by at least 28 days).
  • Children 12 months of age and older should receive two doses of MMR vaccine, separated by at least 28 days.
  • Teenagers and adults who do not have evidence of immunity against measles should get two doses of MMR vaccine separated by at least 28 days.

For more information about what to do if you’ve been exposed to measles, visit the Department's measles factsheet. The CDC has additional information available here

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January 2017: Measles Case in Hudson County

The NJDOH worked with Jersey City Department of Health and Human Services to investigate a confirmed measles case in an individual who developed a rash illness on 1/19 and had recent international travel. As of 02/15/2017, no cases associated with exposures occurring in Jersey City have been identified. Persons exposed would have developed symptoms as late as 02/14/2017. While infectious, the individual potentially exposed persons while visiting the following locations at the dates and times specified:

  • Christ Hospital, 176 Palisade Ave, Jersey City, NJ 07306
    • January 20-January 21, between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m.
    • January 22, between 4:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.

  • PATH Stations: Journal Square and Newport AND
    PATH Train: Journal Square - 33rd St Line
    • January 17, between 8:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
    • January 17, between 5:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.

  • Newport Tower, 525 Washington Blvd, Jersey City, NJ 07310
    • January 17, between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m.
    • January 19, between 9 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.
    • January 19, between 8:25 p.m. and 10:45 p.m.

  • Newport Mall, 30 Mall Dr W, Jersey City, NJ 07310
    • January 17, between 12 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.

  • 145 Harborside, Plaza 2, Jersey City, NJ 07331
    • January 19, between 11:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.

  • LabCorp, 600 Pavonia Ave, Jersey City, NJ 07306
    • January 19, between 12:00 p.m. and 2:45 p.m.
    • January 19, between 4:00 p.m. and 6:15 p.m.

  • Duane Reade, 1 Path Plaza, Jersey City, NJ 07306
    • January 19, between 1:00 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

  • Square 1, 283 St Pauls Ave, Jersey City, NJ 07306
    • January 21, between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
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January 2017: Measles Case in Passaic County

The NJDOH worked with the City of Paterson, Division of Health to investigate a second confirmed case of measles in NJ in an unvaccinated infant who developed a rash illness on 1/21 and had recent international travel. Persons exposed would have developed symptoms as late as 02/15/2017. As of 02/15/2017, no cases associated with exposures occurring in Passaic County have been identified. The Passaic County is case is unrelated to the recently reported travel-related case of measles in a Hudson County adult who also was exposed while traveling internationally. While infectious, the infant visited the following locations at the dates and times specified:

  • Emergency Department at St. Joseph's Wayne Hospital, 224 Hamburg Turnpike, Wayne, NJ 07470
    • January 21, between 6:53 a.m. and 1 p.m.

  • Pediatric Emergency Department at St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center, 703 Main St, Paterson, NJ 07503
    • January 23, between 6:30 a.m. and 3:45 p.m.
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2014-2015: U.S. Multi-state Measles Outbreak

From January 1 to October 23, 2015, 189 people from 24 states and Washington DC were reported to have measles*. Most of these cases were part of a large, multi-state outbreak linked to an amusement park in California. On 01/23/2015, CDC issued a Health Advisory to notify public health departments and healthcare facilities about this multi-state outbreak and to provide guidance for healthcare providers nationwide. No new cases related to this outbreak have been reported since March 2015. The outbreak likely started from a traveler who became infected overseas with measles, then visited the amusement park while infectious; however, no source was identified. Analysis by CDC scientists showed that the measles virus type in this outbreak (B3) was identical to the virus type that caused the large measles outbreak in the Philippines in 2014.

The United States experienced a record number of measles cases during 2014, with 667 cases from 27 states reported to CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). This is the greatest number of cases since measles elimination was documented in the U.S. in 2000.

In 2015, 3 confirmed cases of measles have been reported to the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH):

  • One in a Hudson County resident, January. This case has now recovered and no additional cases associated with this Hudson County case have been reported.
  • One in a Princeton University student, February. The student has recovered and no additional cases associated with this Mercer County case have been reported.
  • One in a Middlesex County resident, May. This case has now recovered and no additional cases associated with this Middlesex County case have been reported.

None of these NJ cases had any identified connection to the measles outbreak associated with Disneyland in California.

NJDOH continues to urge providers to remain vigilant for cases of measles (consider measles in persons who present with fever and rash) and would like to remind all NJ residents, health care, and public health professionals about the importance of receiving up-to-date immunizations, especially prior to international travel.

*CDC will update this data monthly.

For more information on outbreaks, please visit: http://www.cdc.gov/measles/cases-outbreaks.html

 

For more information on measles:

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Last Reviewed: 7/17/2019