Environmental Health

Body Art

CONSUMER RESOURCES

 

GUIDELINES FOR BODY TATTOOING

In order to perform body tattooing, you can either go to a school or learn side-by-side with a practitioner at a body art establishment. In NJ, the state health department (NJDOH) doesn't issue a tattoo license to individuals, but rather an approval, and that's through the local health department where your body art establishment is located. The local health department will verify your credentials, as well as any other artists in your firm. The body art establishment itself is licensed and inspected by the local health department. The tattooing regulations can be found in Subchapter 7.

The level of tattooing that you will be doing is dependent upon how many hours of tattooing experience that you can document, by employment records, business records, references from previous employers, etc. If it's less than 2000 hours, then you would have to work as an apprentice under the supervision of a licensed practitioner until you get to the 2000 hour milestone. You will also need photos of 10 tattoos that you have personally performed along with copies or original consent forms or testaments from 3 clients in order to be qualified as a practitioner.  All apprentices and practitioners must obtain bloodborne pathogen training that is compliant with OSHA regulation 29 CFR 1910.1030.

If you do not meet the above standards, then you will need to apprentice under a licensed practitioner until you obtain the experience/documentation to become a practitioner and/or operator.

Please note that generally, all body art procedures must be performed in a commercial body art establishment, approved by the local construction, zoning, and health departments.

 

GUIDELINES FOR MICROBLADING

Microblading is the practice of using a hand-held instrument, tipped with a grouping or configuration of needles, utilized for penetrating into the lower epidermal layers and/or dermis, so that pigments are introduced and implanted into the lower epidermal layers and/or dermis. It is also known by a variety of names such as eyebrow embroidery, micro-stroking, feather touch and hair like strokes as a form of permanent makeup that provides a means to partially or fully camouflage missing eyebrow hair with the appearance of simulated hair using fine deposits of pigments, colors, and/or dyes. While some refer to microblading as “semi-permanent cosmetics” because the colorants eventually fade, there is no conclusive, consistent, and reliable proof that the pigments, colors, and/or dies will be completely eliminated from the dermal and epidermal layers of skin.

In N.J.A.C. 8:27-1.3, "Permanent Cosmetics," "Micropigmentation," or "Dermal Pigmentation" are defined as the implanting of inert pigments, colors, and/or dyes intradermally which results in permanent alteration of tissue to gain a cosmetic effect." By definition, Microblading is Micropigmentation. Therefore, operators, practitioners, and apprentices of microblading are subject to the requirements of N.J.A.C. 8:27, and in particular subchapter 8 Permanent Cosmetics.

 

GUIDELINES FOR BODY PIERCING

In order to perform body piercing, you can either go to a school or learn side-by-side with a practitioner at a body art establishment. In NJ, the state health department (NJDOH) doesn't issue a piercing license to individuals, but rather an approval, and that's through the local health department where your body art establishment is located. The local health department will verify your credentials, as well as any other artists in your firm. The body art establishment itself is licensed and inspected by the local health department. The piercing regulations can be found in Subchapter 6.

The level of piercing that you will be doing is dependent upon how many hours of experience that you can document, by employment records, business records, references from previous employers, etc. If it's less than 1000 hours, then you would have to work as an apprentice under the supervision of a licensed practitioner until you get to the 1000 hour milestone. You will also need photos of 10 piercings that you have personally performed along with copies or original consent forms or testaments from 3 clients in order to be qualified as a practitioner.  All apprentices and practitioners must obtain bloodborne pathogen training that is compliant with OSHA regulation 29 CFR 1910.1030.

If you do not meet the above standards, then you will need to apprentice under a licensed practitioner until you obtain the experience/documentation to become a practitioner and/or operator.

Please note that generally, all body art procedures must be performed in a commercial body art establishment, approved by the local construction, zoning, and health departments.

 

GUIDELINES FOR EAR PIERCING

Establishments that perform piercing of the lobe ONLY are exempt from the Body Art Regulations.  For establishments that perform piercing of the trailing edge and inner parts of the ear (cartilaginous parts), the following requirements apply:

Ear piercing apprentices must complete a training program, either provided at a piercing school, by their body art establishment operator, or by a practitioner.  Proof of successfully completing a training program must be maintained by the operator on the premises.

The apprentice must then perform three ear lobe and three cartilage procedures under the direct supervision of the operator before performing ear piercings independently.

 

GUIDELINES FOR SKIN AND LASH PROCEDURES

The following procedures are not considered to be permanent cosmetics and are therefore not subject to the Body Art Rule N.J.A.C. 8:27:

 

Eyelash Extensions

Cosmetic Application used to enhance the length, curl, fullness and thickness of natural eyelashes. The extensions may be made from, but not limited to mink, silk, synthetic, human or horsehair. During this process cyanoacrylate is the main method of application.

For more information, contact the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology


Eyelash Perming

This is a perming process that uses protective cream and small curved pads or rollers on the eyelids. The eyelashes are coated in glue and pushed against the curved pad. The glue keeps them in place while a curling solution is applied. The solution stays on for 10 minutes and a second solution follows. The solution is then washed off and the pads are removed, leaving lashes with a freshly curled appearance.

For more information, contact the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology

 

Lash Lift

Is the same basic process as a perm, adds a lash tint or a keratin solution, which is supposed to thicken and lengthen the hair.

For more information, contact the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology


Vitamin Lash Lift

This incorporates tinting which allows lifting, strengthening and straightening (with a slight curve) eyelashes using a combination of vitamins, natural oils and amino acids. This process utilizes silicone pads to lift the eyelashes and coat them with vitamin based lifting product. This allows the eyelashes to grow as much as 50%, for a thicker and longer look.

For more information, contact the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology

 

Eyebrow Waxing

The removal of stray strands of hair with a single strip of wax.

For more information, contact the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology

 

Eyebrow Threading

Eyebrow threading is a hair removal technique for eyebrows and other facial and body hair. Eyebrow threading involves twisting a piece of thread, usually cotton, into a double strand. This double stranded thread is used to pick up a line of hair and then remove it, creating a precisely shaped brow or hairline.

For more information, contact the New Jersey Board of Cosmetology

 

Micro-needling

This is also known as (collagen induction therapy) which is a minimally-invasive treatment that is intended to stimulate collagen in the skin. A small device with fine needles creates tiny punctures in the top layer of the skin (typically 0.5 – 1 mm deep), which stimulates the skin’s natural ability to heal itself and, in the process, produces collagen and elastic. This will improve the texture and firmness of the skin, as well as reduce scars, pore size and stretch marks.

For more information, contact the New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners

 

Laser removal, laser resurfacing, and laser skin rejuvenation

In New Jersey, laser devices are used exclusively by licensed physicians to remove or treat skin conditions. It can also be used for removing tattoos.

For more information, contact the New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners

 

Last Reviewed: 7/15/2021